Seahawks Insider

Leonard Weaver speaks out

Post by Eric Williams on March 24, 2009 at 4:51 pm with 36 Comments »
March 24, 2009 4:51 pm

I talked to ex-Seattle Seahawks fullback Leonard Weaver for the first time since he signed with the Philadelphia Eagles last week. Weaver talked about his frustrations on not getting a deal done in Seattle.


Weaver also said that he believes the team announcing the head coaching change to Jim Mora from Mike Holmgren before last season began created in the locker room.


And he also wanted one last chance to thanks Seahawks fans for supporting him during his time in Seattle.



"I’ve connected with so many people on a personal level," Weaver said. "And it’s just been a hard deal knowing that I want to be here and I made that clear to the organization a number of times, and here it is we still can’t get nothing done.


"And now it resorts to this where I have to make a secondary choice, which I did. So it makes it very tough. Guys like (Lorin) Big Lo (Sandretzky0 and Hawk Fiend, guys who I’ve met on a personal level and who are really passionate about the Seahawks, it’s been tough being able to look at those guys and leave.’


Weaver signed a one-year, $1.75 million deal with the Eagles that could go as high as $2.5 million if incentives are reached. He picked the Eagles over Seattle, Minnesota, Tampa Bay and Houston because Weaver believed he’ll have more opportunities to showcase his skills in Philadelphia’s offense, which is similar to Holmgren’s system, along with having a chance to play with guys like running back Brian Westbrook and quarterback Donovan McNabb.


Weaver and his agent, Harold Lewis, marketed the fullback out of Carson-Newman College as a hybrid who could play both running back and fullback, but had to wait three weeks into free agency before finally making a decision to go to Philadelphia.


Weaver said he believed Seattle did not offer him what he was worth, nor show that they were interested in keeping him because no one from the organization contacted him during the offseason to talk about what his role might be in the offense.


"I felt like if they wanted me to come back to the organization they would have put me in contact with someone involved in the offense, or somebody who’s looking and saying, ‘Hey, we maybe would want to use this guy in this offense,’" Weaver said. "But nobody did, so I kind of felt like, ‘Okay, at least I know where I stand in terms of what direction they want to go.’"


Weaver also said Mora impending takeover as the team’s head coach may have played a role in the team’s 4-12 season.


During his introductory interview in Philadelphia, Weaver talked about a division in the locker room between Holmgren followers and Mora followers.


"I think it affected us as a team a lot," Weaver said in the interview, which can be viewed here. "Some players, I think in some sense, it kind of got divided. The team divided a little bit, some guys were for Mike, some guys were for Jim. And, you know, I think when you make a move like that, that’s not the best move for a team. However, it was what it was."


Running back T.J. Duckett, signed by Seattle team president Tim Ruskell during last offseason, who played for Jim Mora while in Atlanta, addressed Weaver’s statement in an interview with KJR-AM’s Ian Furness on Monday.


"I think in our locker room we had a great locker room," Duckett said. "And I didn’t feel any bad blood or anything that may have been negative. I know we didn’t have the year we wanted to, but guys still came to practice every day and worked, and that was to bottom line. It was a friendly looker room. I’m not sure what happened in terms of other sidebar with themselves and what not. But overall, in general people came to work. … I never felt the focus was on who was going to be the coach next year. It was all on our opponent and what we had to do to win the next game."


You can listen to that interview in this audio link.


Weaver clarified his comments in our conversation today.


"You know, I’m not a mind reader," he said. "Everybody’s agenda is different, but I think it may have had something to do with it for some players because with the new regime coming in and you knowing it’s going to happen, it kind of puts you in a position as a player like, ‘Man, I don’t know if I’m even going to be here next year. I don’t know if this guy wants me as a part of his team.’


"You know, we’re all great players and we all know that. But at the same time, we didn’t know what his (Mora’s) direction and what his plan was. So he’s the guy, and obviously you’ve got to go with his direction. And a lot of players didn’t know, and some did know. So it was a little tough I think, and it could have caused some distractions for some players."


Check out the entire conversation with Weaver below.


Q: Why don’t you talk about the decision making process that eventually led you to take Philidelphia’s offer and leave Seattle. Why was that a better situation for you, and how hard was it to not and resign with the team that gave you your start in the NFL.


Weaver: "The decision was very difficult in some ways, but in others it wasn’t so difficult. Seattle, they’re going in a different direction, of course, and I kind of felt I wasn’t part of that direction. And so that kind of made my decision a little bit better in the sense of using my talents and abilities to be able to further my career and have more opportunities."


Q: Was it a hard decision in terms of the connection you had made with fans here? This is a place where obviously you learned from Mack Strong and other veteran players, and a place where you went to the Super Bowl. Was it hard to break those connection with the organization?


Weaver: "That’s for sure. That’s one thing I’ve been trying to do this week, is set up a press conference, and I’ve been having some static. But yeah, I definitely have appreciative fans, and that’s the reason why I want to do the press conference. I want o let the fans know that I have appreciated them so much. And I don’t think they could begin to understand how they’ve allowed me to come in and accepted me as player and a person in the community, which allowed me to use my abilities and talents to be inspiring, along their ability to cheer for us and be an inspiration for us as well."


Q: Did you stay here during the offseason as well? Is this a place where you made it your full-time home? And did that make it harder for you?


Weaver: "Yeah, it really made it hard because of the relationships I’ve developed here. I know for myself I’m a people guy. I love people and the friends here, I’ve connected with so many people on a personal level, and it’s just been a hard deal knowing that I want to be here and I made that clear to the organization a number of times, and here it is we still can’t get nothing done. And now it resorts to this where I have to make a secondary choice, which I did. So it makes it very tough. Guys like Big Low and Hawk Fein, guys who I’ve met on a personal level and who are really passionate about the Seahawks, it’s been tough being able to look at those guys and leave.


Q: With that said, do you feel like the Seahawks treated you fairly in the negotiation process, and that they offered you a deal that what you felt like you were worth?


Weaver: No, I don’t think it was fair. I don’t think I was worth that. Of course, that’s my opinion. And I believe I bring a lot to the game. And I wasn’t trying to seek anything that I thought was unreasonable. But at the same I have to also respect that they have a new system coming in. They’ve got new coaching and a new way they’re doing things, and I respect that. Of course I wanted to be there, but obviously you can’t change that aspect of the business.


Q: So it sounds like you weren’t sure you would have had as much of a role in the new system as you did in the past?


Weaver: "Exactly. Nobody tried to talk to me. Nobody reached out and said, ‘This is what we want to do.’ And it was kind of weird, because I felt like if they wanted me to come back to the organization they would have put me in contact with someone involved in the offense, or somebody who’s looking and saying, ‘Hey, we maybe would want to use this guy in this offense.’ But nobody did, so I kind of felt like, ‘Okay, at least I know where I stand in terms of what direction they want to go.’ And that’s totally awesome. And from that point on I made my decision and said, ‘You know what, I’m going to go somewhere where I can excel in my abilities and talents, and I’m going to let the young guy Owen Schmitt come in and be the best that he can be, and he’s a great player. So Leonard will be forgotten very shortly.


Q: So you believe Owen Schmitt can come in and fill in reasonably well in terms of the fullback position?


Weaver: I think Owen’s going to come in and do a good job. He’s a young player. He’s a young guy and he’s developing his game. He’s been a fullback longer than I have. I kind of was in that transitional phase, but I think is going to do a great job. And I think he’s going to do a great job pass blocking, along with run blocking. He knows what he needs to work on personally, and I think he’s going to do great job filling in. He’s going to surprise a lot of people.


Q: You took the one-year deal with Philadelphia, and obviously there’s some pros and cons with that. Why did you feel that was the best move for you?



Weaver:
Well, No. 1 I thought going to the East Coast would be more beneficial to my family for that decision. The other part was the offense. I thought it would be great to go to an offense that I was familiar with. I don’t have to worry about the learning curve, and then on top of that I would get the opportunity to do some things and bring some of the talents and abilities that I have to the table to help this team win.


Q: So you felt like it was better opportunity to show what you can do, and then maybe you could get a better contract next year when you get to go out on the market again?



Weaver:
Definitely. That’s for sure. It’s a good opportunity to show what I can do to not only Philly but other teams out there. And then if Philly offers a long-term deal, that would be great. But if not, hey man it was a great time and we move on.


Q: But then you don’t have the security of a long-term deal now. Does that weigh on you at all?


Weaver: It doesn’t weigh on me at all because I know first of all things happen for a reason. And truly I believe in God, and God has helped me so much throughout my career, and I know that he’s going to lead my life every step in every direction I go. Sometime things don’t work out. That’s life, and you’ve got to be ready to adjust. And I have been able to adjust. This is an opportunity to apply myself and be able to have that long-term deal next year.


Q: Did it come down to Philadelphia and Seattle, or were Minnesota and Tampa Bay in the mix as well?


Weaver: No, Tampa Bay was definitely in the mix. Minnesota was in the mix. Houston was in the mix. There were a couple of teams in the mix. They were all around the same area as the Hawks, but I felt like my best fit was in Philly in terms of offense and what I was used to. So I felt like I could go somewhere and be comfortable and fit right on it and be able to compete.


Q: Along with that, you get to play with two guys that can make big plays in Brian Westbrook and Donovan McNabb. That obviously had to have some allure to be able to play with guys like that, particularly with the Eagles finishing one game away from the Super Bowl?



Weaver:
No. 1, that’s one of things I looked at – they’re winning quite a bit. And that’s not to say the Seahawks haven’t been winning. We had one bad year. I think the Seahawks are going to do great next year, and I believe that they are going to the playoffs. But with the Philadelphia Eagles that played a big role. I mean what two guys would be better to be around than someone like Brian Westrbook – to be able to block for him that would be an honor. And also to play behind McNabb, who can make plays with his arm and his feet. That makes my job a lot easier.


Q: In your introductory interview in Philadelphia you mention the fact that you thought there might have been some division in the locker room in Seattle, with players either lining up with Holmgren or Mora last season. How much do you believe that had an affect in the outcome of last season?


Weaver: I think it had a little bit, maybe not a lot. I think injuries had a big deal to do with it. But I think the whole situation with that, probably a little bit because it was announced before the season and it can be kind of a distraction. So, for a little bit I think it did, but I don’t think it was the reason why we lost the way we did.


Q: So are you saying with the coaching change early in the season maybe people were thinking about their future with the franchise in terms of the coaching change and not fully focused on the season?



Weaver:
I think it could have. You know, I’m not a mind reader. Everybody’s agenda is different, but I think it may have had something to do with it for some players because with the new regime coming in and you knowing it’s going to happen, it kind of puts you in a position as a player like, ‘Man, I don’t know if I’m even going to be here next year. I don’t know if this guy wants me as a part of his team.’ You know, we’re all great players and we all know that. But at the same time, we didn’t know what his direction and what his plan was. So he’s the guy, and obviously you’ve got to go with his direction. And a lot of players didn’t know, and some did know. So it was a little tough I think, and it could have caused some distractions for some players.

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Leave a comment Comments → 36
  1. Dirtdawg says:

    the team that gave u a shot u bad mouth . ur low rent weaver.

  2. He wasn’t bad mouthing the Seahawks…sheez.

    It’s our loss and Philly’s gain…Again, if the FO had maintained communication with him,
    he would still be in Seattle and at a reasonable price. I hope he freakin’ tears it up in Philly because we’re going to hear all about it on this blog for years to come.

    He’s a quality guy and left my sons with some memories that they’ll never forget.
    We’ll miss ya’ Leonard.

  3. I think he’s a good fit for Philly, less of one for the direction the Hawks are going; Schmidt’s the better lead blocker, Weaver’s more dynamic. We’ll be fine, the sky isn’t falling, but I wish Weaver well, I think he’ll do very good in Philly, though.

  4. ryanryan says:

    it sounds like he was lost in the lockeroom last year and was doubting himself in the new scheme far before he was given the notion that he would not fit in by the new coaching staff.

    I like weaver but he goes from saying it made a difference (the new coach already being selected) to he’s not a mind reader…IMO that resonated in his own insecurities.

    perhaps if he truly believed that everything happens for a reason and that reason comes from god he would not have been so immature in his statements that are completely see-through. I think he forgets that he himself is someone who is YOUNG and trying to get a foothold in the league (owen comments).

    perhaps the best thing for the front office to have done was not communicate their plan not to include him in their future, it gives a player a chip on their shoulder instead of making them feel downtrodden and useless…”it’s not you, it’s us.”

    that said, he will flourish in his new role in philly and i wish him the best.

    KICK SOME ACE OWEN!!!!

  5. freedom_X says:

    If it’s true that Seattle didn’t talk to him at all, that’s a mistake by the front office/coaching staff.

    But I don’t think talking to him would have gotten him to sign with Seattle for less. Put yourself in his shoes and ask yourself, “Would I take less if the management talked to me.” I doubt it.

    I think he was a good overall talent, and a decent lead blocker but not a great one by any standard. He was probably a better pass blocker than run blocker. With experience, I feel Schmitt will be as good or better a run blocker than Weaver, though he may not every match Weaver’s other skills.

    Weaver seems like a good guy and I hope he manages to get a long term contract with someone, and has a successful career.

  6. Good luck, Mr. Weaver (unless you play us).

  7. I hope Weaver and Westbrook have a kick butt type of year. But they lose to the Seahawks in the NFC champion ship game.

  8. trout_hound says:

    Leonard, you were inspiring to say the least. I was blessed to watch you come from nowhere with the “baptism” and make the team and be a productive player. Have an awesome time in Philly, we’ll miss you.

  9. He said pretty much the ame thing Hutch said, FO didn’t talk to him. It’s happened to others before too. Must be TR’s MO if he really doesn’t want the player here, he just ignores them till they go away.

  10. I’ve said since day 1 of the Mora hiring that it was an idiotic move, both that it was done UNNECESSARILY an entire year in advance & that Mora’s a mediocre coach who should probably be coaching at the UW where his mediocrity would fit right in…………

  11. Dukeshire says:

    “Q: With that said, do you feel like the Seahawks treated you fairly in the negotiation process, and that they offered you a deal that what you felt like you were worth?
    Weaver: No, I don’t think it was fair.”

    I think it’s safe to say he was a Holmgren guy. Nice job, Ruskell.

  12. monmornQB says:

    Too bad the org let such a versatile player leave. The man can block the run or the pass, run the ball and receive as well. I just hope Owen Schmitt can get the job done as well.

  13. Weaver was probably our best overall RB (regardless of RB/FB). You’re right, it doesn’t make sense to let good players leave. It’s too bad so much money is invested in players worse than Weaver (although Jones and Duckett make more). Well, if we draft a certain Georgia RB then it’s really not going to matter because none of them will see the field as much anyways!

    Maybe Julius Jones can be our Chester Taylor? The Vikes signed Taylor for big money only to draft AP the following year. Taylor obviously doesn’t play nearly as much as he thought he would. Hopefully Jones finds out the same thing this year when he’s watching Moreno shred defenses from his cozy spot in front of the tv or on the bench.

  14. hawkcrazy says:

    An interesting read on just how Julius an TJ fit into Knapp’s system. No Moreno Bobby…not at 4.

    http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattlesports/archives/164905.asp

  15. sherminator says:

    I’m sorry to see Leonard leave, but I am more excited to see what our new offense & defense will look like. I think Holmgren’s offense was getting stale, and in defense of letting Weaver go, Holmy wasn’t really using him very well, either.

    Anyway, best of luck to the Church Van, and a better year for him and us both.

  16. OK, let me get this straight: We have a 34 year-old QB with a bulging disk in his back, who threw twice as many INT’s as TD’s last year, and you guys are worried more about drafting a RB with #4?

    Okaaaaay………

    As to Weaver, he certainly is as good as Duckett, can play the same role and is a lot younger. But “Timmay!” didn’t spend $4 million on him just last year.

    Remember, Ruskell’s decisions are driven solely by what makes him look smart, not what’s best for the team overall.

  17. Southendzone says:

    Pretty clear the Hawks didn’t place a priority on bringing Weaver back. This sounds like a mini versio of the Hutch situation. Weaver didn’t feel like the Hawks wanted him during his contract year. They didn’t communicate with him or give him the notion that he was going to be part of the future.
    Some bad blood developed. I get the feeling from what he said above that if the Hawks were talking to him last year about how they wanted him, what he was going to do then the difference in $ wouldn’t have been a big deal and we could have signed him for a smaller contract than Phil offered

  18. BrianBlades says:

    For an FO that values “character” so much, they don’t seem to show it much when it comes to resigning our guys.

    I’m not saying that some guys aren’t going to leave for $$, but why the hell not talk to people and keep them involved to keep all options open. This is a pattern as noted above, and I know things may have been a bit different, but didn’t the same thing happen with Josh Brown also? I formerly beloved player turns ugly and bolts.

    Part of negotiation is money, but everyone wants to feel needed and involved – particularly professional, somewhat spoiled athletes.

    This year is important for the FO, both the draft and performance. Can’t wait.

  19. Dukeshire says:

    “Remember, Ruskell’s decisions are driven solely by what makes him look smart, not what’s best for the team overall.”

    Presuming, for a minute that is true, how is it possible to differentiate the two? Isn’t the teams success the only thing that will make him look smart? I don’t think he has any ulterior motives other than to win. Problem is for me, that I question whether some of his decisions are going to achieve that. He continually puts this team in positions that require additional attention later. Running Back is a perfect example. He cannot possibly believe that Jones and Duckett are the future there. A stop gap, until next year when he, hopefully will find a more permanent answer. Signing Mike Wahle to replace Hutch, 2 years later, is another classic. Stop gap. I understand everything cannot be fixed at once, but fix it right the first time and you don’t have to revisit it. For every step forward he takes, he takes another backward. He does seem to have a plan, but I’ll be damned if I can figure it out.

  20. kinger12 says:

    TJ Housh was also a terrible signing, and lofa and hill and then playing rock paper scissors with Detroit and winning all hands!
    Ruskell does what he can – you can’t always get the best player avail every time since there is that CAP thing.
    And while I loved watching the baptism its clear that our O next year is going to rely much less on a FB. If Weaver was a true amazing RB how come he wasn’t getting more interest from other teams? If he truly was that good at that role???

  21. vichawkfan says:

    I’d be happy with Crabtree or Stafford. Both 21yr olds with tons of upside but dont need to come to a team and be stars right away. Stafford, despite being 21, has more starts in the SEC than Matt Ryan did coming out.

  22. Weaver did not fit the offensive scheme that we are moving to. Knapp wants a pure blocking fullback and that aint Lenny. Seriously guys, we need to get over our man crushes on players. Weaver was a nice story and all but he wasn’t a great blocking fullback like Mack Strong or anything. Clearly he wants touches and not to be blowing up linebackers all day. Owen Schimdt just wants to run people over. Now, I probally am higher on Schimdt then most here but don’t we want players who want to play the role we assign them? Do we want freelancing players who occasionally make the highlight real play(ken hamlin/Julian peterson) or players who are on assingment? Do we want players who know there role and complete it(Mack was a blocker first who would occasionally get the rock thrown to him) or players who want to do something else(Lenny thinks he’s a scatback!). Like any good butcher, Ruskell is just trimming the fat.

  23. freedom_X says:

    My concern about Stafford is that from what I read, he seems a bit immature and brash. He has the best physical talent of all, but the mental makeup is not so certain. But if he’s one of the top 4 players, Seattle has to seriously consider drafting him if he’s the last one of the top 4 left.

    It sounds like Sanchez will go no later than the 20′s, but if Sanchez slips to the low 20′s, Seattle could trade up. Their 2nd rounder is very high, so it might not be too hard to move up into the bottom of the 1st round if they like Sanchez and he’s still there.

    Weaver is a great guy from everything I’ve heard or read. But I agree about the excess fan love for certain players. If Weaver were that good, he’d have gotten a lot more offers and a multi-year deal. If he turns into a star, then no other team in the NFL saw it coming (not even the Eagles, since they kicked the tires once, passed, and then picked him up on a 1 year special fire sale after Weaver had no takers at his price.)

    I also agree on questioning the “Ruskell wants to make himself look good, not the team comment.” That comment makes sense if a person is a low-level employee, but doesn’t hold water for someone at the top. If the team doesn’t look good, Ruskell doesn’t look good. If Seattle is 6-10 this year and there are no extenuating circumstances (massive injuries, etc.) Ruskell may well be gone.

  24. nighthawk2 says:

    Good coaches design a scheme to fit the players they have, they don’t force some scheme they want to run and force guys into that who do other thnigs better. That’s a recipe for failure. And no, Leonard Weaver does not think he’s a “scat back”, he thinks he can do things more than what the stereotypical fullback can do, and he’s right; and he wants to be in a place where he can do that. It’s hardly unreasonable.

    Leonard nowhere mentioned taking the initiative himself and talking to the head coach, or offensive co-ordinator about where or how they saw him fitting into the offense next season. If the team isn’t talking to you, there are some inferences that can be drawn from that, but you have a better argument to say they didn’t want you if you talk to someone yourself. If the coaches hem and haw and say “we’ll have to get back to you on that” then it’s certain they don’t want you/you aren’t in their plans, and you have a better argument to that effect. I agree with the statements about Ruskell’s MO and his ability to alienate players, we did see it before with Hutchinson, Darche and Brown to name a few. He has an abrasive, even arrogant personality that came through clearly in tv interviews (when he used to do them).

    Neither Ruskell nor 31 other general managers thought enough of Weaver to draft him. He was a tight end at small Carson-Newman, and Ruskell doesn’t draft guys from small schools. Ruskell did draft a FB in the 6th round that year, a guy named Tony Jackson from Iowa, and Weaver was signed as a free agent after the draft. I don’t know how much input or care Ruskell puts into that, whether he has a list of guys, or whether it’s based on recommendations of scouts and the coach and he just signs off on undrafted free agents or how it works here. But in any event, Weaver was signed and Holmgren decided in camp and pre-season to keep Weaver over Tony Jackson, who’s never been heard from again anywhere, and we know the rest.

    So I’m not sure just how accurate is to say that he’s leaving the team that gave him his start rather than the coach that gave him his start isn’t here anymore; and that was a bigger factor. I agree with the statement earlier that Weaver is Holmgren guy. Several football/media people have said they didn’t think it was a good decision to announce a new head coach a year in advance, for the reasons Weaver alluded to; Troy Aikman in particular said that. Weaver came to the (logical) conclusion he wasn’t going to be a part of the plans the new capo was implementing and signed a good deal elsehwere. It gives him a year to showcase what he can do in an offense he’s familiar with and he makes a good amount of money in the process.

    I really don’t think we’re taking Knowshon Moreno at 4th overall, but if they pass on Monroe and Oher at 4 Moreno is infinately preferable to Crabtree or a quarterback there. We could take a RB in the 2nd or 3rd, but I doubt they do before the 4th round. The guy I’d really like to see us make a move for is Jerious Norwood in Atlanta. His contract is up next year and they might be willing to move him this year.

  25. nighthawk2,

    “Leonard nowhere mentioned taking the initiative himself and talking to the head coach, or offensive co-ordinator”

    "And it’s just been a hard deal knowing that I want to be here and I made that clear to the organization a number of times, and here it is we still can’t get nothing done. ”

    Isn’t Moreno a stretch at #4? If so, why?

  26. vichawkfan says:

    freedom X – Stafford scored highest among QB’s at 38 on the Wonderlic. If he’s brash and cocky at 21 and throws a 95 mph fastball, I like that. I’ve heard he’s actually quite level headed. Nice thing about him is he’s only 21 and one wouldn’t expect him to start for another 2 seasons. With his natural talent, we could have a very nice replacement for Hass, perhaps better than any future FA out there in two seasons.

  27. of course “Good coaches design a scheme to fit the players they have”, I think we can all agree that Marshall did not do that well, but good coaches do not sign or RESIGN players who do not fit the role they imagine that posistion to fill. We are moving to a Zone Blocking Scheme so we won’t draft Duke Robinson and change the scheme. That just doesn’t make sense. You find players who fit what you want to do or figure ways to make the players you have be effective, but just because a player has talent you don’t bring them in if they don’t fit what you want to do. Do you suggest that we draft speedy wide receivers who don’t run routes well just because they are fast? We will still run a version of the WCO so those guys wont be a good fit. Should be draft a 240 pound saftey who can’t cover when we will be the cover-2 quite a bit? We need players who can fulfill there assisgnments(blocking for Weaver, not loosing contain for Peterson) more then we need folks who occasionaly make the “big” play (Weaver stiff arming nobodies in preseason and Peterson and his big sacks).

  28. I drafted Tim Lincecum in my fantasy baseball draft last year in the 6th round. His average draft position, going into last year, indicated that he should have been a guy taken well after the 10th round. I used my common sense and based his draft position on what I thought his production was going to be for ’08 instead of using his ’07 numbers to indicate where he should have been taken (or where the “experts” said he should go). By taking him “too early” I actually got about the best pitcher in fantasy baseball. This year he’s going much higher (1st-2nd round) and nobody is laughing at taking him that high anymore.

    Granted, football and baseball are different and this is simply a stupid “fantasy” sport. However, the commonality is that taking a player like Moreno isn’t actually taking him “too early” if he turns out to be better than some of the clowns (Eugene Monroe) who “deserve” to be taken before him.

  29. Here comes Owen “the runnaway beer truck” Schmitt. I am pumped to see him blowing people up. He is a beast and is crazy, only bad thing I have heard is he has smaller arms but we know he likes to put a facemask on people (broke 11 of them at west virginia)
    Weaver was overrated by all of you.

  30. IF you like Mack Strong you gotta love Owen Schmidtt, Owen is not a player he is a FOOTBALLplayer, he is though as hell and will run people down and make them afraid of the run game, which will make it easy(ere) for Hass

  31. freedom_X says:

    What’s wrong with drafting Moreno #4? Nothing, if he’s one of the top 4 (or 6, or 10) players. If he’s not, you’re just bidding against yourself, kind of like paying Mercer Island prices for a home on Hilltop. The Hilltop home may be just as comfortable and luxurious as the Mercer Island one, but you’re a fool to pay the same price.

    If he’s valued by NFL teams as a twenties or lower player, it’s a huge mistake to overdraft him, especially as running backs do not have great longevity and it’s the one position that you have a really good chance of filling well in the lower rounds. Otherwise, with a #4 overall pick you have a chance to fill a very difficult hole, with a good player. You can’t throw that chance away.

    We don’t know what Moreno’s value really is unless we can see the draft boards of all 32 teams. Assuming the pre-draft consensus are accurate, he is not, and Monroe clearly is. You can call Monroe a clown all you like because you read a Sporting News puff piece and watched one game of his, but if he’s valued as a top 4 player, there’s probably a good reason. Once again, the draft boards of the 32 teams hold the true “value” for those players, as the customers (NFL teams) see it.

    Based on the values that the current rankings seem to give players, I’d prefer Oher over Moreno at #4. Let me stress again I do not take the current draft rankings as gospel – I’m just using them as a “marketplace” describing the player’s perceived market value.

    If Seattle drafts Moreno #4, it had better be that Seattle thinks he’s at least one of the top 10 players in the draft.

  32. Probably a good reason Tony Mandarich, Charles Rodgers, Audrey Bruce, Bruce PIckens, Tim Couch, etc. were all top 4 picks too, right? Experts would never take a bust in the top 4. Good thing those teams didn’t pass on the above mentioned “players.”

    And time and time again I have stressed that I want to trade down to draft Moreno (so we don’t have to take him at 4) and time and time again I have said I’ll take Oher at 4 if he’s available (before Moreno).

  33. nighthawk2 says:

    “And it’s just been a hard deal knowing that I want to be here and I made that clear to the organization a number of times, and here it is we still can’t get nothing done. ”

    I wouldn’t conclude from that statement that it means he went directly to Jim Mora or Greg Knapp and asked “what role do you plan for me in the offense you’ll be running or do you plan any role at all for me?” as I was suggesting. I have no doubt that he did make it clear to “the organization”, which could mean Tim Ruskell or Mike Holmgren or Jim Mora, that he wanted to stay with the Seahawks though, but that could also just refer to statements via the media. I just don’t know.

    Moreno would be considered by many as a “reach” at 4th overall, because so many don’t regard him that highly. I don’t know how a value system for players is set up by teams, but I’ve to come to the conclusion that if a certain player is who you want, you take him where you think you can get him. If Knowshon Moreno is the guy they want, and they know he’s not going to be there at 37 (and there’s no reason to think he will be), they either have to try to trade down from 4th, or move up from 37th (an expensive proposition); or take him at 4. I don’t see it happening because of the value boards that each team has on where a particular player should go. I disagree with that, but I’m running their draft either. Also think Crabtree is nowhere near a 4th pick overall talent, but I’m in the minority on that one.

    As for Schmitt, I think he’ll do fine for us but he’s not as versatile as Weaver is. I just hope we pick up a better running back than Julius Jones or T.J. Duckett because last year I saw nothing from them that makes me think we can run the ball successfully with those guys, Jones two good games against the 49ers and Rams in weeks 2 and 3 nothwithstanding.

    Bobby, I just don’t understand your hatred of Monroe.

  34. I don’t quite understand why I don’t like him either. I should like him, but I don’t. I’ll like and root for him if we draft him, that’s for sure. And I’ll hope like heck that I was wrong about him if we do take him.

  35. I hate the idea of drafting a QB @ #4. Mirer comes to mind. He was supposed to be the next Joe Montana. He wasn’t. Like Matt Hasselbeck was called out for in this thread, Mirer threw more picks then TDs. Stafford is aout even between TDs and picks. Stafford is a shorter Brett Favre and has the same gunslinger MO. In a WCO he’ll have troubles.

    Curry is #1 ranked player – take him if he’s there at #4 pick.
    Crabtree is #2 ranked player – take him if he’s there at #4 and Curry isn’t.
    J.Smith is #3 ranked player – take him if the other two (above) aren’t available.
    E.Monroe is #4 ranked player – take him if the other three (above) aren’t available.

    Walt is about the same size as Tubbs and he’s nearly as injured. Gotta get a replacement for him soon.

  36. nightwulf says:

    Freedom,
    “immature and brash”? As in “we want the ball, and we’re going to score” immature and brash?:)

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