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Federal judge rules against NCAA in O’Bannon case

Post by Christian Caple on Aug. 8, 2014 at 3:47 pm with No Comments »
August 8, 2014 5:56 pm

A federal judge ruled against the NCAA and in favor of the group led by former UCLA basketball player Ed O’Bannon with regard to student-athlete compensation.

From the AP:

A federal judge has ruled that the NCAA can’t stop college football and basketball players from selling the rights to their names and likenesses, opening the way to athletes getting payouts once their college careers are over.

In a landmark decision issued Friday, U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken ruled in favor of former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon and 19 others in a lawsuit that challenged the NCAA’s regulation of college athletics on antitrust grounds.

In a partial victory for the NCAA, though, Wilken said the NCAA could set a cap on the money paid to athletes, as long as it allows at least $5,000 a year for big school football and basketball players.

And from USA Today:

A federal judge ruled Friday that the NCAA’s limits on what major college football and men’s basketball players can receive for playing sports “unreasonably restrain trade” in violation of antitrust laws.

U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken, in a 99-page ruling in favor of a group of plaintiffs led by former UCLA basketball player Ed O’Bannon, issued an injunction that will prevent the NCAA the “from enforcing any rules or bylaws that would prohibit its member schools and conferences from offering their FBS football or Division I basketball recruits a limited share of the revenues generated from the use of their names, images, and likenesses in addition to a full grant-in-aid.”

The ruling comes a day after the NCAA Board of Directors voted 16-2 to give the five power conferences and their 65 members a level of legislative autonomy never seen before in the history of the organization.

And the NCAA’s statement, from chief legal officer Donald Remy:

“We disagree with the Court’s decision that NCAA rules violate antitrust laws. We note that the Court’s decision sets limits on compensation, but are reviewing the full decision and will provide further comment later. As evidenced by yesterday’s Board of Directors action, the NCAA is committed to fully supporting student-athletes.” 

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