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Greek festival: Gyros, souvlaki, calamari and delicious pastries all weekend

Post by Sue Kidd / The News Tribune on Oct. 5, 2012 at 1:55 am | No Comments »
October 5, 2012 5:05 pm
Groups of church volunteers gather weeks in advance to prepare items like dolmathes, grape leaves stuffed with beef, rice and mint. They'll be served at this weekend's Greek festival at St. Nicholas Church in Tacoma.

My job requires I attend a lot of food festivals – ranging from horrid to hilarious – and honestly, not many are worth your dining dollars. But the Greek festival at Tacoma’s St. Nicholas Church? Absolutely worth the price of admission. OK, well, admission is free to the festival this weekend, but it’s worth a visit because the food is made by an army of church volunteers who aren’t afraid to use copious amounts of garlic, lemon and oregano. I’ve just returned from the festival and all was operating as expected – plenty of crowds and swift service from the army of church volunteers.

This is the 51st year for the festival. The festival gets crowded, but volunteers move lines quickly, this is a well oiled machine – a festival doesn’t make it to its 51st year without some efficiencies. Here’s a guide to how to dine at the festival as well as tasting notes below for everything I sampled. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this blog post for a photo gallery of all the food.

FOUR WAYS TO DINE:
Dining tent: Food booths offer a la carte tastes of gyros, calamari, souvlaki, fries, salad, pastries, coffee and beverages, $1-$6. Exchange cash for tokens to buy at the booths. Leftover tokens can be returned for cash. A deli has take-home foods and Greek grocery items.  Prices are stable this year, except the dolmathes and tyropitakia are $3 instead of $2. Some of the pastries are sold as singles instead of doubles this year.
Sit-down dinner: A multi-course meal for $12-$14. A fish dinner will be served Friday and Saturday, a lamb dinner on Sunday, and chicken will be served all three days. Seatings are continuous. Dinners include salata (Greek salad), fasolia yahni (braised string beans), rice pilaf, bread and coffee or tea.
Kitchen window: Dolmathes and tyropitakia will be served at a window in the kitchen every day, with spanakopita served Sunday. Kitchen window items can be purchased a la carte with tokens.
Upstairs: Trays of baklava and pastry combo packs can be taken home.

Souvlaki pork skewers are $4 in the main dining tent.

MY TOP PICKS IN THE TENT:
(Find photos of every item sampled in the photo gallery below)
Souvlaki ($4): Grilled pork on a skewer with a slightly puckery olive oil marinade and crusted with a heavy thump of oregano.
Gyros ($5): A warm, doughy pita stuffed with ground, pressed gyros meat, onion and a heavy coating of garlicky tzatziki yogurt sauce.
Calamari ($6): Tender fried calamari rings breaded and fried and served with a side of creamy skordalia dip, a potato dip flavored with garlic.
Greek fries ($3):Fries covered in Greek seasoning with a coating of feta.
Tyropitakia ($3): Two flaky triangles of phyllo dough stuffed with salty, melted feta. (served in the kitchen, just off the tent)
Dolmathes ($3): Ribbons of lemon sauce over two stuffed grape leaves, each filled with a missile of seasoned ground beef and rice. (served in the kitchen dining window)
Loukoumathes ($4): Fried puffs of dough dusted with cinnamon and coated with a honey syrup. If you get one dessert, make it this. Most of the desserts are served at the bakery case, but the loukoumathes are made to order at a booth right next to the beverage booth.

Katifi rolls are rolled-up baklava.

FROM THE BAKERY CASE:
(Find photos of every item sampled in the photo gallery below)
Baklava ($3): Layers of phyllo dough soaked in a sweet syrup with a middle layer of chopped walnuts and cinnamon, cut into triangles.
Katifi rolls ($3): Rolled up baklava – shredded phyllo dough stuffed with a sweetened nut filling. It has the texture of shredded wheat.
Galaktoboureko ($3): A baked farina custard with a base of shredded phyllo dough, dusted with cinnamon.
Kataifi Ekmek ($3): Banana pudding base with a shredded phyllo crust, covered with whipped topping and pistachios.
Koulourakia ($1): This is a very crisp cookie – twisted in a slight braid – with a biscotti like crunch and taste.
Kourambiethes ($1): These are a shortbread style cookie coated in powdered sugar – a Greek version of Russian tea cookies or Mexican wedding cookies. They’re buttery and soft, and melt-in-your-mouth delicious.
Melomakarona (called Melos on the sign, $1): This is a honey-soaked cookie covered in walnuts with lots of cinnamon and anise for flavoring.
Ouzo cake ($2): A lemon cake with a light soak in ouzo, an anise flavored liqueur.
Paximathia ($1): Think of this as Greek biscotti, only it had more of a texture of a cookie (as if it had not received a second baking like Italian biscotti). Coated with sesame seeds and with a light thump of anise.

51st annual Greek Festival
Where: St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 1523 S Yakima Ave., Tacoma
When: Oct. 5-7, 2012. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday
Tickets: Free admission. Food prices range from $1 for a la carte items to $12-$14 for complete dinners.
Contact: 253-272-0466, stnicholastacoma.org
Payment: Cash, cards or checks. Exchange leftover tokens for cash if you don’t use them all. Tokens from last year can be reused this year.
Tours: Tours of the church will be given by church leader Rev. Seraphim Majmudar. In 2010, the church completed its iconography project where elaborate murals were painted on the church’s dome.
Dancing: Expect to be entertained, too – and not just because the feast is a fun event for people watching. There’s a stage in the middle of the dining hall for the church’s youth dancers, who perform every few hours all weekend. The dance schedule is posted at the token booth.

Photo gallery of the 51st annual Greek Festival
Calamari with skordalia dip, $6

Dolmathes are $3 for two beef-and-rice stuffed grape leaves.

Greek fries coated in feta, $3

Greek salad, marinated kalamata olives with feta, served in the dining tent.

Marinated pork souvlaki, $4.

Tyropitakia, cheese turnovers, are $3 and found in the kitchen window adjacent to the dining tent.

Loukoumathes are deep-fried dough balls dusted with cinnamon and drizzled with a honey syrup ($4)

Baklava, $3.

Galaktoboureko, baked farina custard with a base of shredded phyllo dough, dusted with cinnamon, $3

Kataifi Ekmek ($3): Banana pudding base with a shredded phyllo crust, covered with whipped topping and pistachios.

Katifi rolls ($3): Rolled up baklava - shredded phyllo dough stuffed with a sweetened nut filling. It has the texture of shredded wheat.

Koulourakia ($1), a very crisp cookie - twisted in a slight braid - with a biscotti like crunch and taste.

 

Kourambiethes ($1), a shortbread style cookie coated in powdered sugar - a Greek version of Russian tea cookies or Mexican wedding cookies.

Melomakarona ($1), a honey-soaked cookie covered in walnuts with lots of cinnamon and anise for flavoring.

Ouzo cake, which tasted more lemony than of the anise flavored liqueur, $2

Paximathia, Greek biscotti flavored with anise, $1

A chicken dinner, served through Sunday, in the dining hall. The sit-down dinner is multi-course and a fixed price, $12-$14.

Diners can exchange cash, check or credit for tokens, which are used to buy a la carte items in the dining tent.

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