Seahawks Insider

Morning links: Harbaugh’s the man you love to hate

Post by Eric Williams on June 25, 2013 at 6:42 am with 26 Comments »
June 25, 2013 6:43 am
San Francisco 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh protests a non call by the officials after a 4th down play against the Baltimore Ravens during the second half of NFL Super Bowl XLVII football game Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, in New Orleans. The Ravens won 34-31. (AP Photo/Gene Puskar)
San Francisco 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh protests a non call by the officials after a 4th down play against the Baltimore Ravens during the second half of NFL Super Bowl XLVII football game Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, in New Orleans. The Ravens won 34-31. (AP Photo/Gene Puskar)

Danny O’Neil of 710 ESPN Seattle delves into Seattle’s growing dislike for Jim Harbaugh on the heels of recent comments made by Seahawks receiver Golden Tate. The Notre Dame product said he’d like to give the San Francisco head coach the Sean Lee treatment during an interview with Bob Stelton and Dave Grosby last week.

O’Neil: “Our city has had enemies, plenty of them from Ken Behring and his attempt to hijack the Seahawks on down to Los Angeles to that venti drip of coffee baron who sold our NBA team – and at least a little bit of his soul – to some carpetbaggers from Oklahoma, to a certain vertically challenged basketball commissioner who did everything but rent the moving vans to send the Sonics east. Alex Rodriguez inspired more than a decade of hostility when he left for all that money in Texas while Bill Leavy remains despised in this city after the officiating mistakes that marred Seattle’s Super Bowl loss to Pittsburgh.

But those are villains as opposed to rivals, and the fact that we waste more time hating them than they spent worrying about us makes it all the more aggravating.

And that’s why this increasing antagonism with the 49ers in general and their coach in particular is so compelling: Seattle finally has a dance partner in the rivalry business.”

Matt Barrows of the Sacramento Bee writes that the animus toward Harbaugh is nothing new – folks have wanted to take a shot at the San Francisco head coach for decades.

Clare Farnsworth of Seahawks.com takes a closer look at Seattle’s situation at quarterback, with Russell Wilson solidifying the position for the first time in three seasons.

Matt Williamson of Scouts Inc. believes Christine Michael – the No. 3 running back on Seattle’s depth chart – will be a top 10 runner in the league by 2016. You must be an ESPN Insider to view this. Williamson: “The selection of Michael seemed like an odd one, but Marshawn Lynch, with his extremely violent running style, probably isn’t going to last long in this league. Michael is a first-round caliber talent, but has a lot of questions off the field. Expect Pete Carroll and company to harness Michael’s great talent by bringing him along slowly. By 2016, he will be a total stud and a true every-down running back. Ignoring their extenuating circumstances, Lattimore and Michael are the most talented all-around running backs from this latest draft class.”

Pat Kirwan of CBS Sports challenges our football knowledge with a 20-question test on the 2012 NFL season.

Adam Rink of NFL.com puts CenturyLink Field atop his list of must-see stadiums in the NFL.

ESPN’s Bill Williamson writes that NFL analyst Ron Jaworski ranks Matt Flynn as the worst quarterback in the league, pointing out his lack of arm strength.

Writing for ESPN, Matt Bowen breaks down how to stop Robert Griffin III and Washington’s read option. You must be an ESPN Insider to view this.

Rob Rang of NFLDraftScout.com highlights the Honey Badger in his Finding the Fits series focusing on the Arizona Cardinals.

Categories:
Morning links
Leave a comment Comments → 26
  1. GeorgiaHawk says:

    I know I’ve said this before but I can’t wait to see Christine Michael play. Michael, Ware, Harper, Williams, and the rest of the rookies are probably the most physical group of rookies this FO has drafted yet.

    We have great depth now and the potential to have better and more physical special teams play too.

    Add that to the big time hitters we already have and I can see this team ,(top to bottom) being the most physical in the NFL

    Like klm008 said-“A box of hammers.”

  2. seatowntp says:

    Matthew Barrows article addressing a lifetime of animosity toward Harbaugh is both funny and revealing. After reading that I pondered, how does someone become that person? Does he have a DSM-V diagnosis?

  3. I’m glad to know we are not the only people that hate Jimmy boy. That article was awesome, and i’d give anything to see fans rush the court to dig their knuckles into Jim’s face. I sure hope we slaughter the 9ers 2 times (or 3!) this season so we can see those looks of disgust on his face.

  4. Dukeshire says:

    I’ve been wondering where Matt Bowen went. He just fell off the face of the earth over at National Football Post. He is a great X and O guy. What’s a real drag is that you have to be a Mothership Insider to read him now. May have to bite the bullet.

    As for the Harbaugh thing: SF hates Carroll equally. Sept. 15th is going to be just awesome.

  5. Hate Harbaugh for his arrogance, perpetual whining, and for what I perceive to be a general level of unpleasantness about the guy. When I read in some article that he can have worked with low-level staffers at the Niners facility for years, and walk by them in the hallways without acknowleding them, it kind of confirmed my thoughts. Doesn’t mean I don’t respect his coaching ability, I do.

    As for Seattle villains, the ones way, way ahead of the pack are Schultz, Stern and Bennett; and that will continue until the day they bring back the green and gold.

  6. Dukeshire says:

    Kirwin’s exam is great. I’m a pro bowler! lol

  7. I’ve been slammed with work this week, so I haven’t had time to follow some of the threads lately.

    Just now it hit me. We just quietly made our best offseason move to date! And, it’s not Harvin or Avril or Bennett. It’s not landing Michael or Williams or Hill from the draft.

    As far as I’m concerned, extending John Schneider for three more years is the best move so far this year.

    We have the Russell Wilson of GMs. Or, the John Schneider of QBs.

    He’s young, he’s brilliant at his job, and he’s at the top of the food chain. By all accounts Schneider’s passion and work ethic are unsurpassed. He works for the richest owner in the NFL.

    So, he’s not going anywhere anytime soon. Check back in 2016 to read about his next extension.

    And, would it surprise anyone to see Carroll still coaching and trying to heave a football 80 years on his birthday 20 years from now? Maybe by then they’ll be able to install bionic arms. I’ve been waiting for one myself since the days when Lee Majors played Six Million Dollar man. I actually cried when they cancelled that show when I was ten. Anyway…

    While we’re anticipating this year’s Superbowl run -got chills down my spine just by having the nerve to temp fate and and put that in writing- Schneider and Carroll are already planning our 2014, 2015, and 2016 rosters.

    If you’re one of the young on this blog, enjoy the ride. Many of us older guys have been waiting for this moment for over 30 years.

    The best thing is that they’ve constructed team that will sustain itself. Pay attention because we’re looking at the start of a dynasty. Dumb luck and good fortune can get teams to a Superbowl once.

    Building a football powerhouse from top to bottom that runs like a well oiled machine is the key to staying at the top. And, that’s what’s going when the FO makes puzzling decisions. I remember the comments when we took Michael in the 2nd round. “We don’t need a running back”. Not this year…but our 2014, 2015, and 2016 campaigns likely will need one. Finding talent isn’t something you can just put off until you need. This front office extremely resource when they have to be.

    But, clearly they’re always thinking further ahead than anyone else including fans, media, and football prognosticators. People who are truly gifted at what they do often make up their own rules as they go along. You can’t argue with success.

    That article about Michael becoming a top back in the league clearly illustrates their foresight. He was arguably the top back in last year’s class, and now he’s a Seahawk. Wait until you have a need before thinking about the problem and you get end up signing the Julius Jones’ and Lendale White’s of the world.

    We have the best young QB in the league. He throws to one of the top WR units in the league. But, we’re not a throwing team. We have one of the most talented backfields with depth to spare.

    We have arguably the best OL coach in the league who has assembled an immensely talented group of tough and nasty guys to protect our QB and make our running game work.

    We have the best secondary in the NFL, and we have young talent being brought along slowly. Our linebackers our fast and smart. Our DL is one of best in the business against the run, and we’re stock piling talented depth to who’ll slowly rotate into game situations as they develop elite skills.

    Our offense practices against one of the best defenses in the NFL. And, our defense practices against an offense that is on the verge of greatness, thus making them both better.

    Who made all of this happen in just three years? We have just as much talent in our scouting department, coaching staff, and management structure as we put on the field.

    And, we have an owner who smartly lets the pros do their job and provides whatever resources they need to get it done.

    What an exciting time to be a Seahawk fan.

    So much so, that I have my lawyer adding stipulations to my parenting plan that will ensure my kids are with me for NFL Championship games and Superbowls each season the Seahwks make it through 2020.

  8. trout_hound says:

    Inspiring post, Audible. After 37 years, I think we are due. But I’m working really hard not getting my expectations too high….

  9. ChrisHolmes says:

    One of the things that makes me really happy to be a Seahawks fan right now is that we are a physical football team – a true smashmouth, in-your-face, bump-you-at-the-line team. We play defense physically and brutally, and we play offense the same way. Our guys want to punish the other team no matter what side of the ball it is.

    I cannot remember a time when our team was considered “physical”. I mean, I was young during the Knox era, so maybe my recollection isn’t accurate, but even then I don’t remember the Seahawks being mentioned as one of the more physical teams in the NFL.

    And yet, as of right now, we’re at or near the top.

    This is a thumper of a team.

    I used to watch other teams and be jealous. The Stealers. Ravens in their heyday. Green Bay. Bears. Those teams brutalized their opponents.

    I mean, how many times can you remember watching our team and thinking, “Damn, we’re soft. We’re getting killed.” It felt like every week.

    And now we’re the punishers.

    And we finally have a legit franchise QB.

    And a legit front office tandem that is killing it.

    Couldn’t be happier.

    P.S. I know everyone hates Harbaugh, but before we hired PC he was the guy I wanted. I think he’s a helluva coach. He’s an ass – but if he’s your ass, you love him. I think he would have done well in Seattle.

    That said, I’m glad we have PC and JS instead. Same winning without the asshatness.

  10. montanamike2 says:

    This is the best of times to be a Hawk fan, we’re a team that everyone hates to face, especially at home. Soft no more!

  11. “After 37 years, I think we are due. But I’m working really hard not getting my expectations too high….”

    In any given season, there are probably five teams with very good shots at winning the Super Bowl and another five with pretty good shots. I think Seattle will be in this mix for much of the next decade, as long as Pete is the HC and Russell is the QB. Whether they win the Super Bowl this year depends on a lot of factors, but they have a very good shot at it. In fact, they have a shot (if the chemistry works out) at being a totally dominant team. That’s pretty exciting. The regular season can’t get here soon enough!

  12. Jim and John Harbaugh are so different. John is so likeable. Jim is so punchable.

  13. SlickToxic21 says:

    Totally agreed Audible….great post.
    Trout there is no better time in our 37 year history to get seriously jacked about our chances…this year, and for the foreseeable future.
    I don’t think it’s “drinking the Kool-aid” to expect a 12+ win season, and a trip to the Super Bowl. We are one of the very elite teams in the league. We have talent, we have swagger, we have coaching…..sure there could be some bad breaks along the way, you never know…but this team is pretty deep, and will be able to thrive with the next man up approach.

    ….and no doubt I’m a homer…but I still see things for what they are…and I don’t get how people could hate PC. He’s a very likable guy. I know SF would hate him just cuz he’s in their division, and he has a very good team….but I don’t think it would be the same kind of hate/dislike that people would have towards Harbaugh…who is just simply a very unlikable coach. Always frowning, yelling, running his mouth, cocky, etc.

  14. Dukeshire says:

    Chris- I would say that yes, those Knox teams were considered physical, for sure. Very blue collar, very hard, very aggressive.

  15. GeorgiaHawk says:

    Nice post Audible.

    I think we almost have all the ingredients for some good things to happen here.

    This team reminds me in some ways of the Jimmy Johnson Cowboys.
    -Great college coach comes in-Johnson/Carroll.
    -Both coaches are great motivational leaders.
    -Both started with very little talent.
    -Both in a short time turned their rosters around and accumulated great talent.
    -Dallas had the big three-Aikman, Smith and Irvin.
    -The Seahawks have their big three- Wilson, Lynch and Harvin.
    -Both have/had good defenses.

    The only major differences that I see is-

    1- The Seahawks have the 12th man.
    2- The Seahawks have an owner without an ego.

    3- Dallas actually made it happen and had a dynasty. If Jerry Jones hadn’t blew it all up they may have had a few more Super Bowl rings.

    I think Jimmy Johnson has seen the similarities too. He’s pretty much been on the Seahawks bandwagon since the first year.

    About 45 minutes long but worth the time if you are a Jimmy Johnson fan.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lI_Ki88kkk

  16. GeorgiaHawk says:

    Eric,

    It would be interesting to see/hear Ken Norton Juniors take on the similarities of Carroll’s Seahawks and Johnson’s Cowboys after year three of the rebuilding process.

  17. One thing I detest even more than people like Harbarf, are their apologists. You know, the ones who snarkily imply that anyone who finds fault with the behavior of the Harbaughs of the world are ignorant and/or stupid, or just wimpy. Case in point, the blog post on Harbarf linked to above.

    Personally, I loathe Harbaugh, but it has little or nothing to do with the fact that the Niners ate our rivals. What I cannot stand is his demeanor and behavior, which to me epitomizes what has gone wrong in Sport and in America in general; the idea that winning is everything/the only thing, that when you lose in a sporting event you have no value as a person, team, or coach, the mindset that it is acceptable–glorious even–to gloat when winning, to rub your opponents noses in their defeat, that winning is so important that Sportsmanship and winning (and losing) gracefully is a sign of weakness, that whining and lobbying for referee calls to go your teamn way when the call was obviously correct, and where losing your composure is a matter of course.

    Harbaugh

  18. One thing I detest even more than people like Harbarf, are their apologists. You know, the ones who snarkily imply that anyone who finds fault with the behavior of the Harbaughs of the world are ignorant and/or stupid, or just wimpy. Case in point, the blog post on Harbarf linked to above.

    Personally, I loathe Harbaugh, but it has little or nothing to do with the fact that the Niners ate our rivals. What I cannot stand is his demeanor and behavior, which to me epitomizes what has gone wrong in Sport and in America in general; the idea that winning is everything/the only thing, that when you lose in a sporting event you have no value as a person, team, or coach, the mindset that it is acceptable–glorious even–to gloat when winning, to rub your opponents noses in their defeat, that winning is so important that Sportsmanship and winning (and losing) gracefully is a sign of weakness, that whining and lobbying for referee calls to go your teamn way when the call was obviously correct, and where losing your composure is a matter of course.

    Harbaugh–and those who worship him–demonstrate their lack of sportsmanship and class regularly. And it sickens me to read articles that profess to know why those of us who despise people like him feel the way we do. Stop labeling all dissenters as if you know them, and don’t you dare speak for me!

    Very soon the Rams will be just as fierce a rival as Harbarfs Niners, yet Jeff Fisher is a fierce competitor and a man I respect because he is a sportsman and usually behaves as such. I will never respect Harbarf no matter how much he wins because of his attitude and behavior. So the opinion that anyone who dislikes Harbarf is simply jealous of his success is an idiot.

  19. Are our rivals…stupid autocorrect!

  20. seatowntp says:

    “I will never respect Harbarf no matter how much he wins because of his attitude and behavior.”

    Even taking that a step, or two, further, I will rejoice in his failures because of his persona.

  21. The SacBee article is hilarious! From beaning a young girl in little league (for crowding the plate) and riling up the parents of both teams in the stands, to the fights he started in basketball games where not only the other team was after him, but the fans swarmed the court trying to get in a few punches on him as well!! Oh and his brother relates that the family moved around a lot while they were growing up which suited his brother fine as he would lose all his friends and be ready to go to a new place after a couple years, with his brother as often the only friend he had left.

    Great read!

    I’d feel sorry for him if he didn’t always seem to bring it on himself.

  22. montanamike2 says:

    Yes it’s easy to hate on douchebaugh, no class at all. I totally believe the Hawks players that said douche was gloating after they lost the first game in SF. I just want Kam to destroy whatever recievers they have left.
    I’d love to hang 40+ points on them in their house.

  23. rramstad says:

    Yep, I really enjoyed watching the 49ers lose in the Super Bowl, precisely because of their coach. Normally I’d grit my teeth and cheer for pretty much any NFC team, just because, but never the 49ers.

    Winning with class is an essential thing to learn at any level of athletics. I coach youth football and this is something we stress to our kids.

  24. FleaFlicker says:

    Duke, you totally smoked me on that Pat Kirwan quiz, but it was still pretty fun.

    This question was a freebee:
    #17. Which team owned the league’s lone undefeated (8-0) home record?
    A. Indianapolis Colts
    B. Denver Broncos
    C. New England Patriots
    D. Seattle Seahawks

  25. trout_hound says:

    I’m excited about the year, I just don’t want our team to feel entitled since they are being enshrined before the season has even started. I love the fact that we know we can beat anybody. Will we? Probably not. But we’ll give it a hell of a shot, just like we did last year. I’m confident in that. And I’m just happy to root for a competitive team again.

    The really bad part? It sucks balls trying to get affordable tickets to a Hawk game now. Its hard to justify dropping nearly a grand on a couple of seats, but I will probably give it a shot. The last time I tried to buy a couple of tickets online when they opened up the extra seats in the summer, I clicked the exact second the Ticketbastard frenzy started and ended up with two seats at the very top row of the stadium. It was fun (but the Hawks stunk). I couldn’t see crap without binochs.

  26. Stats are interesting to look at, but can get confusing. Important stats are points made vs allowed. Like Mr Boling (I think it was) said, every football game is made up of five separate games:
    1) team A’s run offense vs team B’s run defense,
    2) A’s pass offense vs B’s pass defense,
    3) A’s STs vs B’s STs,
    4) B’s run offense vs A’s run defense, and
    5) B’s pass offense vs A’s pass defense.

    A strong offense should score lotsa points vs a weak defense, and a strong defense should hold a weak offense scoreless. Stronger teams rack up large positive point differentials between points made vs points allowed, whereas lucky weakish teams may win some close-call games, but lose by lotsa points otherwise. Doesn’t mean the lucky team doesn’t win the Super Bowl vs the statistically stronger team, but they’ve gotta outperform their usual stats. For example, SEA’s worst point differential was in ’76 with a -200 (that many more points were allowed by SEA’s defense than made by their offense), and their best point differential was in ’05 with 181 more points scored by their offense than allowed by their defense. The next best point differential in SEA’s history was last season with 167. That 167 came from the offense racking up 412 points over the regular season while the defense only allowed opponents to score 245. Except for the shortened season of ’82, that was the lowest number of points ever allowed by a SEA defense. The next was Knox’s last season (’91) with 261, then ’05 with 271, 282 in ’84, 286 in ’90, 291 in ’07, 293 in ’86, and 298 in ’99. SEA’s offense has scored more than 400 points in reg season only 5 times: 452 in ’05, 418 in ’84, 412 in ’12, 404 in ’03, and 403 in ’83. Really good offenses score between 400 and 500 points and very good defenses allow only 200 to 300 points. The best teams point differentials have been in the 250 point range.

    Salary cap, draft slotting, and schedules are designed to keep teams success rate moving toward the mean. The change in the point differential should also vary from season to season, based on the above, but some teams have found ways to maintain their success rate high over time. The change in point differential should increase steadily, then plateau. For instance, Jim Harbaugh’s first season (’11) improved in point differential by 192 points over Singletary’s ’10 season, which was the biggest improvement in SF 49ers history. Then between Harbaugh’s 1st and 2nd season the point differential decreased 27 points (mostly due to defensive drop off). Whereas, in ’10 PC’s point differential improved only 13 points over Mora’s ’09 team point differential. Then between the ’10 and ’11 seasons PC’s team’s point differential improved by 103 points. But between ’11 and ’12 SEA’s point differential improved by 161 points. The only bigger improvement in SEA’s history was the point differential between the ’04 and ’05 seasons, when it improved by 183 points. I’m expecting another good improvement in point differential between last season and this one, before it plateaus.

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