Seahawks Insider

Tate eager to be back

Post by Dave Boling / The News Tribune on Nov. 25, 2010 at 4:17 pm with 19 Comments »
November 25, 2010 4:17 pm

Here’s the lead item to the Seahawks notebook for tomorrow’s print edition. Other items will include previously mentioned injury stuff, and a bit on which rookies fell for the old Free Turkey scam.

By Dave Boling

RENTON _ The broadcast kept running replays of Golden Tate’s injury, and showed his leg bending in a way usually reserved for race horses destined to be euthanized.
By the time he hit the ground in that game at Oakland on Halloween, Tate was certain his season was over.
“When it happened, I honestly thought I snapped my leg or my ankle,” Tate said. “I was sure I did something awful to it. So, in my mind, it was a blessing I came out with an ankle sprain.”
Tate, the team’s second-round draft pick out of Notre Dame, was having a good game, with two catches for 36 yards after having caught just eight balls through the first six weeks of the season.
“I had a decent game, and it was starting to click,” Tate said. “I was starting to feel good about myself, but then, boom … the injury.”
But in the three weeks since, Tate feels as if he’s turned into something of an unofficial veteran.
“The way I’m looking at it is, my rookie season is over,” he said. “This is like a new start, a new season, my second season. I’m going to try to do everything right, I’m listening, I’m going to be very coachable; I’m going to do everything it takes to get on the field as much as I can.”
And that started with studying.
“I took that time I was injured to really watch the guys, to study things: Why is Mike Williams catching 10-11 balls? That sort of thing. If I can study that, I’m better off. I wish (the injury) wouldn’t have happened, but in a way it was a good thing. I could watch, break things down, and see some things I hadn’t seen.”
During a part of Thursday’s practice, for instance, veteran Brandon Stokley had Tate on the side and was showing him moves, gesturing with his hands.
“That’s a guy you want to keep by your side and listen to,” Tate said. “There’s a reason he’s played this game (12 years) and has excelled. There’s some plays in practice where I would help myself if I wouldn’t have drifted, small things, things that make a difference. Things I can work on.
“Another great thing is that Matt (Hasselbeck) has been willing to work with me on things, too. If there are things I need to work on, it’s nice to have guys around who are helping me.”
With Mike Williams’ status in question because of a foot injury, and Stokley recovering from a calf injury, Tate’s return could be crucial for the Sunday game against Kansas City at Qwest Field.
“It’s good to be back out on the field and running around again,” Tate said. “It feels good to be involved again and getting a chance to work on the things I need to.”

Leave a comment Comments → 19
  1. I never really realized that Tate was that “uncoachable?” I thought all the reports were that he was a good, solid kid/citizen coming out of Notre Dame. This kind of came to light after being inactive in week 1. But, now, making a comment like “I’m going to try to do everything right, I’m listening, I’m going to be very coachable.” Does that mean he still wasn’t “listening” even after week 1 if that we his recent quote? Maybe I’m interpreting it wrong, but it’s pretty frustrating to listen to as a fan to hear this from someone who already has a wake-up call after the week 1 incident. I’m rooting for the guy and I hope he means it (like he said he meant it after week 1) perhaps even more so because I was a big supporter of drafting him in the first place.

    Golden Tate, make me proud!

  2. Without Williams, we will be easier to prepare for… Here’s hoping he plays, as I believe our offense success is a mjr key to this game….

  3. I think you might be reading too much into that comment, BobbyK.

    He’s just saying he’s going to do everything he can to take advantage of an unexpected opportunity, and he’s listing all the things he thinks a good player should do. It doesn’t mean he wasn’t doing any of those things before.

    If he’d said he was going to work hard, would you infer that he’d been loafing?

  4. Part of the stuff prior to week 1 was that he wasn’t as coachable as he should have been (in part, relying on natural talent). So this disturbing proclamation has already been acknowleged by the organization. Is this more of the same or not?

  5. Dukeshire says:

    For what it’s worth, I don’t interpret any of what’s gone on as he’s uncoachable. My impression has always been that he hasn’t be as attentive to detail as is needed to play at the NFL level. Not that he’s refused to do what has been taught. There’s a small but significant difference there, as anyone who has coached (as many of us have / do) can attest. Doing the minimum of what’s asked of you and seeking out more and being proactive in your own growth and improvement is maybe the shift we’re going to see and hopefully what he’s talking about.

  6. You’re probably dead-on about “doing the minimum of what’s asked of [him] and seeking out more and being proactive in your own growth and improvement.”

  7. Re Golden Tate, BobbyK et al, he was just being his usual young and rawly talented “it’s my groove and I’m so cool” self. And now–apparently–he can finally see (we hope) that it’s a very, very different game out there in the NFL than he thought: more deliberate, more precisely capable…or nothing works well for long. And even the so-called “worst” of teams and players are far, far better than anything you’ll see at the college-level. So enjoy all its emotional energy, but love the rarified skill on display almost matter of fact every week and game of an NFL season. We’re all pretty spoiled really watching all this NFL athletic skill on display…it’s hard as hell to play that consistently well, in fact, as I just watched Drew Brees and the Saints do to the Cowboys tonight in their big glitz-fandangle of a Dallas stadium. Quality…in bit quantity, and on the road!

    But I’d still like to see the Seahawks, just once, sometime pretty soon, before I die, win me a Super Bowl game. That’s really all I ask: just do it; no more talk, no more endless rebuilding, just make it happen…soon.

  8. Dukeshire says:

    “We’re all pretty spoiled really watching all this NFL athletic skill on display”

    No doubt. These NFL players are gifted athletic freaks.

  9. If Williams is unable to play and Tate fills in for him, I feel like he’ll trade some big plays with some really terrible errors… like some fumbling trying to get extra yards, a big drop, or something of the like. In any case, it’ll be nice to get Williams back.

  10. vichawkfan says:

    shut it BK….from what’s it worth.

  11. rramstad says:

    Yeah, I think what is happening here is pretty classic. Tate is so gifted physically that in general he’s been able to freelance, and still been able to be super productive on the field. He gets to the NFL, and suddenly, his physical talents aren’t good enough. He needs to know what to do out there, or his abilities aren’t being utilized enough.

    I don’t think he was ever uncoachable, but once the light comes on and he realizes that he can’t get by on ability alone, he suddenly becomes VERY coachable, as he’s eager and willing to learn, instead of going “yeah, yeah, yeah, just throw me the damn ball”.

  12. CDHawkFan says:

    Dave or Eric,

    Can you let us know the type of background checks NFL teams make on potential draft picks? I am sure they do there homework, but I would like to know to what lenghts they go.

    I went to a big hockey school, a few of our players went on to the NHL, Team USA, 1st rounders, 2nd rounders etc. I could have predicted who might/would struggle out of the gate as a fellow student. Whether it was through word of mouth on campus or observations at parties. Some of these guys became friends, not close friends, but well enough to gauge. Maybe teams think that is a bit too close, to ask fellow students or to send someone into a campus party. After 12 Bush Light Drafts, I probably would have said a few things.

  13. chuck_easton says:

    vichawkfan,

    That may have been a bit strong there.

    There have been ‘hint’s all pre-season about Tate not running the correct routes, not knowing the plays, thinking he could just get by on his talent like he did in college.

    Then come week 1 he’s a healthy scratch. As anyone who has played/coached knows you sit your talented player because you are sending a message. That message is ‘what you are doing isn’t working and won’t be tolerated’.

    The team is keeping it in house but there is enough there that you don’t have to be Sherlock Holmes to deduce that apparently Tate hasn’t exactly been proactive in making the effort to do what’s expected of him.

    BobbyK is just saying (or typing) what has become very apparent. With all the talent the kid has he should be playing. What’s keeping him off the field is most likely between the ears. Either he’s dumber than a bag of hammers or he just doesn’t care enough to want to learn what he’s supposed to be doing.

    Personally I hope it’s the latter because that can be fixed with a little attitude adjustement. If it’s the former then Tate may never get it and may never realize his full potential. But so far this season he hasn’t exactly been stellar on the field when called upon and he’s spent almost as much time as a spectator as I have.

  14. Dave Boling says:

    Background checks? They keep this pretty close to the vest. It starts with the scouts. We got Ruskell talking about this one time. They start taking info on prospects well before their senior year. He said that scouts develop relationships with coaches and know the ones on staffs who will give them the straight scoop. They get to know trainers, too, because they say that trainers sometimes know more about a player and his durability, toughness, etc., than coaches do. Ruskell’s guys also supposedly checked on campus with advisors and professors, etc., to try to get an idea how this guy handled himself around faculty and other students.

    Some teams have former law enforcement officers or agents who are familiar with doing background and legal checks. And I think they pull them in when a team gets serious about prospects. There are endless interviews at the combine of course. We’re not really talking about that many serious prospects. The get some things wrong, of course, but the real surprises are pretty rare in the NFL … not like the Mariners being taken by surprise by the felonious pitcher they got from Texas, or the CFL team that drafted a kid who had died in the off-season.

    What they can’t tell in all their checking is how a player will react once he gets that first big check. Some of these guys work like crazy to get to the NFL, collected a nice contract that is more money than they could have ever imagined, and then are not motivated to work hard to become a true professional and get to that second contract. Impossible to predict.

  15. ryanryan says:

    i take tate’s comments to mean that he was able to slow down and digest the things he has been taught, simulating an offseason. the season is so long and yet moves so fast when you’re a rookie (so i’m told…lol) that i bet it’s hard to really have everything sink in until you can take time to reflect.

    when you take a break from doing something that has been overwhelming, the pressure is relieved and you can gain clarity. that clarity, i think, is what atheletes mean when they say the game slows down.

    but what do i know?

  16. Reporters who cover the CFL were recently asked to name the next CFL player who could make it big in the NFL:

    (48 responses: 10 different players received votes)

    1. Solomon Elimimian, LB, B.C. — 10 (20.8)

    2. Emmanuel Arceneaux, WR, B.C.; Yonus Davis, RB/KR, B.C. — 9 (18.8)

    3. Chad Owens, SB/KR, Tor. — 8 (16.7)

    4. Cory Boyd, RB, Tor. — 6 (12.5)

    Others receiving votes: Brendon LaBatte, OL, Wpg. — 2; Greg Carr, SB, Wpg.; Juwan Simpson, LB, Cal.; S.J. Green, SB, Mtl, and Stevie Baggs, DE, Ham., all received one vote.

    Source: Winnipeg Free Press

    The top three are in B.C., so I hope the Seahawks are scouting them! The hard-hitting and quick LB Elimimian just won the rookie of the year award, and two of the recent ROY winners, Cameron Wake and Martell Mallett, are now in the NFL.

  17. Dukeshire says:

    Dave / Eric – Where do you see Gordon playing? Was he brought back to take snaps from Balmer at LDE? He has seemed to be consistently pushed around while Siavii has at least shown some nice moments anchoring NT. Curious where you see him fitting in. Thanks.

  18. NisquallyHawk says:

    RyanRyan…I think you nailed it….I just would have thought with Mike Williams on the team and knowing of his journey to get back to the NFL ….he would have sniff the coffee….when he was getting his donuts…so to say!

    ryanryan says:

    i take tate’s comments to mean that he was able to slow down and digest the things he has been taught, simulating an offseason. the season is so long and yet moves so fast when you’re a rookie (so i’m told…lol) that i bet it’s hard to really have everything sink in until you can take time to reflect.

    when you take a break from doing something that has been overwhelming, the pressure is relieved and you can gain clarity. that clarity, i think, is what atheletes mean when they say the game slows down.

    but what do i know?

    Read more: http://blog.thenewstribune.com/seahawks/2010/11/25/tate-eager-to-be-back/#ixzz16PiwBRKa

  19. Meanwhile, I see on ProFootballTalk.com that our old pal Houshmandzadeh is saying he wants to come back with the Ravens next year … IF they intend to use him in the way that he thinks he ought to be used.

    Some things never change.

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