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Tag: Skip Priest

Jan.
26th

Federal Way looks for way to secede from Sound Transit

Federal Way is firing a shot across the bow of Sound Transit.

The city is upset that Sound Transit expects to scrap plans to bring light rail to Federal Way by 2023 as part of the $17.9 billion mass transit measure voters approved in 2008. The agency’s tax revenues from South King County have dropped by nearly a third, so the agency plans to delay the extension to South 272nd Street until 2034 or later.

Now six proposals tied to Sound Transit have surfaced in the Legislature with backing from Federal Way.

None of them would bring more trains

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June
21st

Environmentalists sort out ‘champions’ from ‘duds’

An environmental group praises Reps. Skip Priest and Geoff Simpson as “champions” while singling out Reps. Christopher Hurst and Troy Kelley and Sen. Tim Sheldon as “green duds.”

Washington Conservation Voters released its scorecard today, ranking each legislator on their environmental votes in 2009 and 2010 on a scale of 0-100.

South Sound legislators Hurst, Kelley and Sheldon are among five Democrats — the others are Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen and Rep. Tim Probst — who come in for criticism.

Hurst’s and Kelley’s votes in this year’s special session to put energy-efficient upgrades of schools on the ballot weren’t enough to save them from the group’s ire. The Conservation Voters website says Hurst and Kelley earned low 44 percent ratings when they “voted against clean water, against the protection of our shorelines, against energy efficient televisions, and against transit for Pierce County.” They call Hurst’s record “shameful” and “likely (to) backfire on him in the near future” and say Kelley is “severely out of step with both his party and his constituents.”

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June
2nd

Priest’s open seat draws field of candidates

Rep. Skip Priest‘s state House seat is drawing a lot of interest.

At least five candidates have entered the race to represent the 30th District in south King County since Priest announced he would leave the House to run for Federal Way mayor.

Democrats Roger Flygare, CEO of a court reporting company, and Carol Gregory, who leads a Renton-based anti-poverty group, have registered campaigns with the Public Disclosure Commission. Two Republicans have registered, Milton Mayor Katrina Asay and Federal Way school board member Ed Barney.

Most recent to announce a run is Jerry Galland, a resident of unincorporated King County who campaigned against a 2007 annexation by Federal Way. Galland didn’t identify a political party in a news release announcing his candidacy.

Here’s Galland’s news release:

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May
2nd

Running is nothing new for Barney

Ed Barney made news last year for running 185 miles on the Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic route, a four-day jog.

Now the Federal Way school board member is running for the state House.

He will seek the seat that Rep. Skip Priest is leaving behind to run for Federal Way mayor, Barney told a crowd Saturday at a kickoff event for the Senate campaign of a fellow board member, Tony Moore.

Cue the obligatory pun: He’s “in it for the long run,” he says.

He complained that the school district has lost $24 million in state funding since

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April
19th

State workers: Don’t take us for granted

Sen. Pam Roach is the only senator who did enough this year to avoid a scolding from a major state employees group.

The Washington Federation of State Employees is denying endorsements to most legislators for now, saying they “waged a systematic campaign to dismantle human services and inflict extraordinary and unnecessary sacrifices on state employees.”

In case you’re scratching your head trying to remember these sacrifices, a quick recap of this session:  Democrats raised taxes as unions requested, didn’t cut pay for state workers, and ponied up an extra $65 million for worker health insurance, but they also closed three state institutions and downsized two others, cut about 3,000 state-employee and educator jobs, and furloughed as much as a quarter of the workforce.

The rhetoric may have bothered unions as much as the actions: Republicans demanding reopening of worker contracts; centrist Democrats complaining their party wasn’t doing enough to outsource non-core functions of government like the state print shop and liquor stores.

The result: Only 18 House members, mostly liberals, and the conservative Roach received backing Saturday at the union’s Endorsements Conference. The stamp of approval puts them on the fast track for the group’s endorsement — and the promise of fundraising help that comes with it.

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