Inside Opinion

What's on the minds of Tacoma News Tribune editorial writers

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Tag: Newt Gingrich

March
1st

Politics doesn’t get much more personal than this

This editorial will appear in Friday’s print edition.

Tomorrow’s a big day for state Republicans. They’ll gather in schools, community centers, lodge halls and church meeting rooms to conduct a highly personal brand of politics: the party caucus.

They will make and listen to impassioned speeches for the four presidential candidates – Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul – and select delegates to the county convention. A non-binding straw vote will be taken, with the winner getting bragging rights three days before the big Super Tuesday contests in 10 states.

The outcome of the straw poll is important enough that all four GOP candidates stumped in Washington at least once. The official winner won’t be named until the party’s state convention starting May 30 in Tacoma.
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Jan.
13th

Super PACs ratcheting up heat in 2012 campaign

This editorial appears in Friday’s print edition.

Mix unlimited campaign donations with the very weakest pinch of disclosure. Throw into an overheated primary season and what happens?

One need only look at all the attack ads in Iowa and New Hampshire paid for by the so-called super PACs supporting Republican candidates – groups with such names as Restore Our Future (Mitt Romney), Winning Our Future (Newt Gingrich) and the Revolution PAC (Ron Paul). Waiting in the wings: The already well-larded Priorities USA Action super PAC supporting President Barack Obama’s re-election and the prospect of super PACs trying to influence congressional races as well. Read more »

April
20th

The birther conspiracy Kool-Aid flows uphill

This editorial will appear in Thursday’s print edition.

Normally we’d wait for Donald Trump’s “presidential campaign” to die a natural death, but his embrace of the birther lunacy makes for too sweet a target.

Trump’s taken to trumpeting his doubts about Barack Obama’s citizenship and demanding that the president produce his birth certificate. Obama – who appears to relish the spectacle – has turned the pseudo-controversy into comedy material.

Trump is one of a handful of Republican leaders (if that’s what he is) willing to sound like an actual birther. Michele Bachmann prefers artful coyness; all she wants is that Obama “just answer some questions” and produce his original birth certificate. Newt Gingrich and Mike Huckabee have alluded darkly to the president’s supposed Kenyan background. Read more »

April
16th

Piqued my interest

Some tidbits I ran across today:

Washington Post
By Douglas E. Schoen and Patrick H. Caddell
Friday, April 16

We are Democratic pollsters who argued against the health-care that the Obama administration chose to pursue. Instead, we advocated incremental health-care reform. With the passage of health reform, some harsh political realities have emerged.

Recent polling shows that despite lofty predictions that a broad-based Democratic constituency would be activated by the bill’s passage, the bill has been an incontrovertible disaster. The most recent Rasmussen Reports poll, released on April 12, shows that 58 percent of the electorate supports a repeal of the health-care reform bill – up from 54 percent two weeks earlier. Fueling this backlash is concern that health-care reform will drive up health costs and expand the role of government, and the belief that passage was achieved by fundamentally anti-democratic means. …

Put simply, there has been no bounce, for the president or his party, from passing health care. …

Democrats can avoid the electoral bloodbath we predicted before passage of the health-care bill, but in one way: through a bold commitment to fiscal discipline and targeted fiscal stimulus of the private sector and entrepreneurship.

And (this is about a lawsuit against the University of California headed for the Supreme Court):

Washington Post
By Newt Gingrich and Jim Garlow
Friday, April 16

Americans like to think of their college campuses as marketplaces of ideas where students have the opportunity to freely browse a host of competing beliefs, attitudes and philosophies. Unfortunately, today’s academic marketplace is more like a company store. A single, humanistic, decidedly leftist worldview is sold in too many classrooms . . . and the customer refuses delivery at his or her own risk.

And I found it fascinating that this discovery was based on the observation of six atoms:
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