Inside Opinion

What's on the minds of Tacoma News Tribune editorial writers

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Category: Election

July
16th

Our choices for Federal Way City Council and School Board

This editorial will appear in Wednesday’s print edition.

Federal Way voters have some superb candidates for their City Council and School Board on the Aug. 6 primary ballot. The top two vote-getters in each race will advance to the Nov. 5 general election.

The City Council races are for two seats currently filled by candidates who were appointed in January and now are seeking election in their own right.

In Position 2, the appointee is Kelly Maloney, a marketing executive with good ideas for improving the city’s image and bringing in more investment. She’s pushing to lure a private four-year

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July
14th

With port on an even keel, keep Bacon on commission

This editorial will appear in Monday’s print edition.

When things are going well, it’s not a good idea to rock the boat. That maritime analogy is appropriate to the Port of Tacoma commission race on the Aug. 6 primary ballot.

Although three port commissioners are up for election, only one drew opposition, four-term veteran Connie Bacon in Position 1. Commissioners Don Meyer and Dick Marzano are unopposed.

Running against Bacon are former Port of Tacoma security director Eric E. Holdeman of Puyallup and engineer Dave Dormier of Gig Harbor. The two top vote-getters will advance to the Nov. 5 general

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July
11th

Johnson for Bonney Lake mayor, Stuard for Sumner City Council

This editorial will appear in Friday’s print edition.

Many incumbents on local city councils and school boards are facing no primary opposition this year — and some are even running unopposed. Not so in the East Pierce County cities of Bonney Lake and Sumner, where every incumbent up for re-election has at least one opponent.

However, only two races will be on the Aug. 6 primary ballot because they have at least three candidates running. The top two vote-getters will advance to the Nov. 5 general election.

In Bonney Lake, Mayor Neil Johnson is being challenged by longtime City Councilman

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July
10th

A choice of superlatives for Puyallup School Board

This editorial will appear in Thursday’s print edition.

Only one seat on the Puyallup School Board is up for election this year. It’s a shame there aren’t three — one for each of the hyper-qualified candidates competing for Position 4.

That’s how good Karen Edwards, Margie Silver and Kathy Yang are. For the Aug. 6 primary, we favor Edwards in a very tough call, but the district’s students would come out ahead with any of them.

Puyallup’s schools have a single overriding problem: space. The district already crams more of its students into portables than any other district in the

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July
9th

Simpson’s our choice for Lakewood City Council

This editorial will appear in Wednesday’s print edition.

The leadership in Lakewood must be doing something right. Of the four City Council seats up for election this November, only one – the sole open seat – is being contested.

Three first-term council members – Mike Brandstetter, Mary Moss and Jason Whalen – are unopposed. That’s a far cry from years past when Lakewood often saw fiercely fought campaigns against incumbents.

The open Position 5 seat was vacated by Doug Richardson when he was elected to the Pierce County Council. Former council member Helen McGovern-Pilant was appointed to fill the position,

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Jan.
27th

Puyallup students make the case for bond passage

We editorialize Monday in support of Puyallup School District’s Feb. 12 bond measure. It’s badly needed and would, among other things, help get rid of about 90 portables by replacing or rebuilding four elementary schools and adding classrooms to all three comprehensive high schools.

Students at those high schools – Rogers, Puyallup and Emerald Ridge – are fierce cross-town competitors. But several of them teamed up for a video, “Follow the apple,” in which they give practical, personal reasons for passing the bond measure from students’ point of view. To watch it on YouTube, click here.

Jan.
26th

Portable-heavy Puyallup needs voters’ bond measure support

This editorial will appear in Monday’s print edition.

One reason many people move to Puyallup is because of its highly regarded schools, which boast high on-time graduation rates and innovative programs.

But Puyallup’s dirty little secret is that about one-fifth of its 20,000 students are consigned to spend all or part of their day in the district’s 220 portable classrooms, many of which are hidden behind schools and largely invisible to passers-by. Puyallup has more portables than any district in the state – even though it’s only the ninth largest.

Portables can be a useful way to deal with student population growth spurts. But they’re inefficient, costly and not meant to be part of a long-term solution. Portables cost more to heat, cool and maintain, and they have only about a fifth the life span of a school building. Many have no bathrooms, and security – a growing concern for many parents – is hard to provide in the sometimes far-flung campus “portable farms.”
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Jan.
3rd

Voters guide statement fiascos show change is needed

This editorial will appear in Friday’s print edition.

Pierce County now has had back-to-back debacles over who writes the “against” statement that appears in the voters pamphlet.

Both involve a notorious local felon and publicity hound, Robert “The Traveler” Hill, and they reflect obvious flaws in how statement writers are selected.

In the first case, Hill applied to write the statement opposing last fall’s Pierce Transit tax measure. Only one other person applied, and he said he wouldn’t participate if he had to collaborate on the statement with Hill – a jail inmate who’s had widely publicized, bizarre run-ins with the law. The Pierce Transit board’s lawyer reportedly said that no candidate could be rejected unless there were at least four applicants.
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