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Inspector General finds $900 million inventory of Stryker parts at Auburn warehouse – Read full report here

Post by Adam Ashton / The News Tribune on April 1, 2013 at 10:10 am |
April 1, 2013 11:07 am
Joint Base Lewis-McChord Stryker brigades have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan 10 times. This photo shows a Lewis-McChord unit in Afghanistan in 2010. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Juan Valdes)
Joint Base Lewis-McChord Stryker brigades have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan 10 times. This photo shows a Lewis-McChord unit in Afghanistan in 2010. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Juan Valdes)

Better late than never.

Last week, we found a Defense Department Inspector General report from late last year that took a critical look at how the Army pays for maintenance of its more than 2,500 Strykers.

It found a stockpile of nearly $900 million worth of replacement parts, most of them at a warehouse in Auburn. Take a look at our news story on the report here.

The IG seems to be encouraging the Army to normalize its Stryker maintenance programs. The Army developed the infantry vehicle just before the start of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. As a result, it continued to revise the vehicle based on its performance in combat and it paid for maintenance from manufacturer General Dynamics rather than shift routine work on to soldiers.

The full report is posted below.

Here are some highlights:

  • Obsolete material: Investigators found $69 million worth of equipment that is no longer used in Strykers. The material included $58 million in outdated infrared equipment, $11 million in obsolete Stryker seats and about $900,000 in defunct ramp equipment. The Army and contractor General Dynamics can resell some of this material.
  • Excess inventory that could be reused:About $10.8 million in unneeded Stryker replacement parts could be put to work on other Stryker-related contracts to reduce the Army’s overall spending on the program. For example, the Army bought 7,568 units of replacement netting worth $893,000 for existing Stryker vehicles even though it had no need for that material. General Dynamics could have used the material to manufacture new Strykers.
  • Excess inventory with reduced demand:Investigators found $6 million worth of parts the Army bought in large quantities that it likely will never use because of a 2010 Stryker redesign. The Army kept buying the parts through 2009 with the fix on the horizon. It now has enough pinions to last 1,147 years, enough left-hand brake assemblies to last 923 years and enough right-hand brake assemblies to last 297 years.

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