Mariners Insider

Mariners 8, Rangers 1 — Bradley ejected, Teixeira looks solid

Post by Ryan Divish on March 17, 2010 at 10:18 pm with 4 Comments »
March 17, 2010 10:27 pm

BOX SCORE

Sorry for no game thread. I was behind on my stuff for the paper and with the game being televised, I figured we could skip a night.

Obviously, one of the more interesting aspects was Milton Bradley being ejected in the third inning. Manager Don Wakamatsu said that home plate umpire Dan Bellino (an ump I’ve never heard of) said it was because Bradley dropped his bat on a called third strike. Wakamatsu talked with Bellino between innings and was very animated by Wak standards.

“I didn’t understand it,” Wakamatsu said. “In all fairness to Milton, I actually thought he thought it was three outs. He started taking his gloves after his bat dropped. Then he picked up the bat and walked off – and that’s what I told the umpire. I didn’t think that was called for. I told him thought it was an overreaction on his part.”

“I told him to go back and look at (Bradley’s) actions and tell me if he didn’t think that (Bradley) thought it was three outs,” Wakamatsu said. “I just didn’t think it was called for.”

The rest of the game was pretty dang ugly. The Rangers banged out 11 hits, including four home runs – two from Nelson Cruz.

Wakamatsu liked the 11 strikeouts from Mariners pitchers and only two walks before the two innings.

“It shows we’re challenging hitters,” Wakamatsu said. “I’m not really concerned about the home runs right now.”

Starter Ian Snell pitched 4 innings, allowing three runs on six hits, while walking one and striking out five. He gave up two of the home runs.

“I thought Snell looked good,” Wakamatsu said. “The things you are looking for, we’ve talked about being a little more focused and I thought his preparation before the game. ”

David Aardsma struggled pitching just 2/3 inning allowing four runs on three hits, with a walk and a home run.

Wakamatsu said Aardsma’s command isn’t there. And his secondary pitch – the splitfinger – hasn’t come around yet.

But easily the best pitching performance came from Rule V pick-up Kanekoa Texeira, who threw 1 2/3 innings hitless  innings with three strikeouts.

“I really liked what I saw with him,” Wakamatsu said. “If you just watch his arm, he’s got what they call a quick arm and he’s got late action because of that. If you look at his sinker, it breaks later in the zone.  For a guy that hasn’t pitched at a very high level, he’s pretty impressive maturity wise.”

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Leave a comment Comments → 4
  1. wabubba67 says:

    I like Wak sticking up for Bradley in that situation…it demonstrates to Bradley that Wak is willing to defend him. Maybe it will make Bradley feel even more appreciated in Seattle v. his prior experiences. The called strike was horrible and the overreaction by the umpire was worse. As a basketball coach it reminds me of an official making a horrible call and then giving the coach a technical for questioning a call…a good official knows that the call was questionable and gives the player or coach a little bit of slack.

  2. footballscaa says:

    The umps in both leagues bit on Bradley very quickly, evidently with good reason. A good player, takes his strike and heads back to the dugout without crying about it.

  3. wabubba67 says:

    Watch again footballscaa…no crying (lips never moved) on a VERY questionable third strike, simply dropped his bat and began to peel of his gloves before quickly picking up his bat and heading for the dugout. His head never turned toward the umpire. That is an egomanical, insecure umpire…I’ve encountered officials like that on the basketball court. Nothing you can do.

  4. footballscaa says:

    Umps don’t like him. I’m yet to be convinced. Just me.

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