Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Tag: social services

May
29th

BUDGET: Put people ahead of tax loopholes

The state budget is vitally important to our neighbors who are struggling to find affordable housing, a good-paying job, affordable health care and nutritious food. Thousands of Pierce County families would fall farther through the cracks if not for our safety net.

Budgets are about values; they are a reflection of our priorities. The House budget puts children and communities first; the Senate budget keeps costly tax loopholes open at the expense of the most vulnerable. We can’t protect special interest tax breaks while cutting access to essential services for children and families.

Many families in our community and across

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April
15th

BUDGET: Senate plan would hurt needy people

The state Senate operating and capital budgets proposed in the past two weeks would cut housing, health care and child care for vulnerable citizens in these ways:

• Eliminating the Aged, Blind and Disabled program.

• Cutting state homelessness programs by 52 percent.

• Increasing the number of people experiencing homelessness during the 2013-2015 biennium by 20,400 more people.

• Drastically cutting a variety of safety net programs like Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Working Connections Child Care.

• Significantly cutting the Housing Trust Fund

While an education-focused budget for K-12 and higher education will help solve many of

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March
6th

BUDGET: State can be compassionate and save money

Re: “How to get to a balanced, sustainable state budget – with no gimmicks” (Viewpoint, 3-4).

It’s just plain contradictory that state Sens. Jim Kastama and Joseph Zarelli are calling for reform, as they did in their guest commentary, but also chose to eliminate the kind of reformed program our state should be protecting: Disability Lifeline.

This program provides essential health care access for people with disabilities to manage chronic conditions, maintain stability and get back on their feet. But more than just being a true lifeline for 20,000 of our most vulnerable, it saves the state millions of

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