Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Tag: social media

Nov.
12th

SHOOTINGS: Social media can be ally against violence

Re: “Far more can be done to prevent school shootings” (TNT, 11-10).

Social media platforms are the new threats and suicide notes. Social media is one of the dominant ways that we as a society communicate to one another, and it’s time that we use this interface as more than just a tool for finding “the one” or a nearby restaurant.

The writer of this article points out what should be obvious.

By strengthening the social network around teens, we can increase the chances of preventing tragedies like the one that occurred at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. This first step

Read more »

March
25th

SCHOOLS: Teacher-student interaction always existed

Re: “Crossing the line online” (TNT, 5-23).

Social media and use of technology in itself may make it easier to see blurring of student-teacher interaction, which school districts have tried to regulate, but it has not targeted the true reason for sexual misconduct between teachers and students.

Before there was Facebook and texting, the teacher-student interaction blurring was just as easy when teachers lived close in the same neighborhood where they worked, had their children attend the same school they teach at, and interacted with students in local businesses. Many teachers allowed school field trips to their home years

Read more »

March
29th

FACEBOOK: Age limit should be higher than 13

Facebook users who identify themselves as over 13 years old are allowed to gain access to the site. Almost everyone in my classes is on Facebook, and they describe it as an easy way of communication and a
helpful resource to get help on homework through communicating with classmates.

But I know that Facebook also serves as a medium for inappropriate content. Whenever I see harsh language or inappropriate pictures, it makes me wonder whether 13-year-olds should be allowed to have Facebook accounts.

I tend to believe that the age restrictions should be stricter. Clearly, with more than half

Read more »