Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Tag: Richard Sanders

Oct.
25th

SANDERS: No one answered justice’s question

State Supreme Court Justice Richard Sanders told court administrator Shirley Bonden (TNT, 10/23) if someone is in prison for any reason other than committing the crime, “I want to hear about it.”

Bonden claimed there is “racial bias in the criminal justice system from the bottom up.” Despite her claim, it appears she had no examples for Justice Sanders.

The “real” problem with the American judicial/prison system is not race it is poverty. Poor people with little education, no stake in the system and nothing to lose commit crimes disproportionate to the rest of the population regardless of their race.

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Oct.
22nd

ELECTION: Rid court of Sanders’ biased agenda

The News Tribune endorsement of Richard Sanders for Supreme Court Justice is quite preposterous. The endorsement (editorial, 10-18) reads like a flowing apology of unethical acts (some for which Sanders received sanctions), yet your editorial board views him as a rational voice for civil liberties.

There is enough diversity on the court to render balanced opinions. Sanders is simply on the bench to serve his own personal vendetta against the government.

As evidence of that, I note that Sanders’ opinions in criminal appeals favor the criminal defendant and are against the prosecution 94 percent of the time – certainly not

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Oct.
21st

ELECTION: Wiggins is a distinguished candidate

There is much to like about Justice Richard Sanders. He’s a charming and relentless populist. You can see it in all his decisions – voting with the majority when they agree with these views, dissenting when they don’t. Sanders really sticks to his guns.

But that better describes an advocate than a judge, and the distinction is critical. The “rule of law” entitles citizens to an assurance that the outcome of cases turns so far as possible not on the personal views of the judge but on principles laid down by the Legislature in a governing statute or fairly emerging

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Oct.
18th

ELECTION: Check out recent Sanders dissent

If you like the decisions issued by Justice Richard Sanders, I suggest you check out his recent dissent in State v. Ish (Docket No. 83308-7).

Sanders would have reversed the conviction of an admitted murderer based upon the trial judge allowing the prosecutor to mention that one of the state’s witnesses had promised to tell the truth. Seven justices faulted the prosecutor for “vouching for the witness” by this reference but found the error harmless. One justice saw no error at all. Only Sanders found the “error” so harmful as to require reversal.

Aug.
10th

ELECTION: Chushcoff beholden to no one

After reading the article regarding the specter of bias on the state supreme court (TNT, 8-8), I wondered if you were aware that for Position 6, the only candidate not touting endorsements is Judge Bryan Chushcoff.

While both incumbent Richard Sanders and challenger Charlie Wiggins repeatedly extol their endorsements here, there and everywhere, Chushcoff is the only independent candidate in this race as it is intended to be – apolitical.

Supreme court justices should not be representing the Republican nor the Democrat ideologies. They should be representing the people of Washington.

Chushcoff also is not accepting campaign contributions. Isn’t this

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July
30th

ELECTION: Justices should be more judicious

When Justice Richard Sanders yelled “Tyrant! You are a tyrant!” from the audience at the U.S. attorney general, The News Tribune lamented his behavior as “hardly judicious” and said it ignored rules of common sense and courtesy (editorial, 12-1, 2008).

In 2009, in response to the publicity about his failure to disqualify himself for a conflict of interest, Sanders said he wouldn’t benefit from the court ruling because any money coming as a result would have gone to his lawyer (TNT, 3-11, 2009).

He would have us believe that he doesn’t personally benefit from a court ruling in which he

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