Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Tag: prison

Dec.
29th

PRISON: There’s value in Correctional Industries

It is unfortunate that The News tribune chose to reprint two stories (12-28) from the Seattle Times regarding Correctional Industries (CI) without first contacting anyone involved with this valuable program. The Times’ stories, in my opinion, are both slanted and lacking a complete description of the program.

The mission of CI is to provide inmates with positive experiences during their incarceration. They are not compelled to participate. In fact, they must apply for the jobs and can be removed from the program if they do not participate in a positive manner.

CI

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Nov.
20th

PRISON: Overcrowding is just part of the problem

Re: “Now, state needs more prison space” (TNT, 11-29).

Being a 20-year “veteran” resident of the Washington Corrections Center for Women at Purdy, I see myself as somewhat of an expert on overcrowding. The excessive number of people here leaves the living areas feeling somewhat congested. It makes for bad attitude and increased tension levels.

I am now in minimum security. While different from medium custody, it’s still as “crazy.” Violence is a side effect of the influx of population.

There is a cure for that. The administration says there’s no way to separate people who have

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March
1st

PRISON: Don’t outsource inmates’ work

Re: “Inmates set to lose work as uniform bill advances in Olympia” (TNT, 2-29).

House Bill 2346 has to do with prison inmates making corrections officers’ uniforms. It began by the officers’ union asserting that the clothing was substandard and ended with the rationale that having inmates make officer or prison employee clothing is a conflict of interest.

Comments attributed to officers were that making clothing was not a realistic activity to prepare inmates to the working in society, and instead we should fund post-secondary education opportunities.

Years ago, post-secondary degrees in prison were stopped as they were funded

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