Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Tag: higher education

Jan.
6th

EDUCATION: TNT on target in supporting higher ed

Re: “2015 action agenda” (editorial, 1-4).

We deeply appreciate The News Tribune’s editorial urging the Legislature to protect funding for two- and four-year colleges and universities. As the editorial stated so well, the education goal line can’t stop at K-12. Washingtonians need access to higher education for well-paying jobs and a prosperous economy.

Investments in higher education flow through the students and into our economy and communities, elevating the quality of life throughout our entire state.

(Brown is executive director of  the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges.)

Sep.
30th

COLLEGE: Loving your work isn’t always enough

We’ve all heard from our parents: “Do what you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life.”

However, you can’t continue to do what you love unless someone is willing to pay for it, so why is it that so many college students seem to ignore the economics aspect of the job market?

Countless college grads wind up unable to find work in their fields every year. My advice is to look for what you love within a field that has the demand to offer you that job you seek.

If you love, say, helping people to overcome

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Sep.
8th

EDUCATION: All kids aren’t college material

Re: “Common Core addresses dumbed-down education” (Off the wire, 9-6).

Reading the Bloomberg View editorial concerning the Common Core curriculum, the question that kept coming to my mind was “Why?” Why the emphasis on preparing our children for college?

It’s well known that not all of our kids wish to go to or are capable of college. To that end we need a good vocational curriculum for those who choose not to go to college. Let’s prepare them for life just as emphatically as we try to prepare those more academically gifted.

We are all guaranteed equal opportunity by the Constitution,

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June
23rd

EDUCATION: Starbucks’ initiative is welcome

I am thrilled as a student to hear of Starbucks paying attention to educating its employees. Morally, I will feel better paying $5 for a coffee at its establishments as opposed to making my own “cup of Joe,” as a student at San Diego State University.

It is honorable of the CEO of Starbucks, in partnership with Arizona State University, to provide employees with more rewarding careers. I am looking forward to seeing how well this program turns out and its impact on Starbucks employees and others, as I have experienced the struggle of my friends attempting to balance working

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Aug.
14th

HIGHER ED: Caliber of person is what counts

Re: “A higher ed system for the rich, another for the poor” (editorial, 8-11).

Your editorial noted a disparity between educational opportunities for the rich and those of the poor. You cited a Georgetown University study which excluded Asians, who, by definition, still comprise a minority in this country. Perhaps Asians were not included because, whether rich or poor, they value education more than some other minority groups.

That wealthy colleges may attract the rich disproportionately should not doom the graduates of poorer colleges to automatic failure. I personally attended a “lesser known” college, without familial support or scholarship

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Aug.
12th

HIGHER ED: Base admission on merit

Re: “A higher ed system for the rich, another for the poor” (editorial, 8-11).

This editorial proclaims an advantage in higher education opportunities between the rich and poor in America. This should come as no great surprise in a capitalist-based economic system, where more money ensures greater advantages in higher education as in everything else where money counts.

Taking private schools out of the equation, however, all public institutions of higher education should be merit-based only. You make the grades, you get in – with financial aid provided as needed. Legacy, endowments and diversity should not be used as

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Aug.
12th

HIGHER ED: Money’s always bought privilege

Re: “A higher ed system for the rich, another for the poor” (editorial, 8-11).

I found your editorial very perplexing. Where have your writers been for the last 100 years?

The system of the wealthy being admitted to Ivy League schools has been a known fact all of my life. Public colleges and land grant colleges such as Washington State University were established so that more students with limited means could be educated.

That is not to say that students with high academic credentials should not be admitted, it is just a fact of life that money buys privilege.

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July
30th

COLLEGES: The rest of the higher ed story

Your editorial on postsecondary education (TNT, 7-29) uses hyperbole and uninformed generalizations to put down a specific group of students and institutions while failing to offer solutions or constructive concepts.

The bipartisan bill, the Supporting Academic Freedom through Regulatory Relief Act, was introduced by Reps. John Kline, Virginia Foxx and Alcee Hastings. It has received significant support from many institutions across all of postsecondary education, including  the American Council on Education and the Association of American Universities.

Our institutions are as much defined by our students as anything else; your editorial makes passing mention of this fact. We serve

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