Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Tag: campaign finance

May
4th

POLITICS: Voters need to exert their power

We are hearing a lot these days about conflicts of interest and large donations regarding Hillary Clinton and the Clinton Foundation. The fact is that conflicts of interest and large donations happen every single day within all parties in our Congress.

These individual and corporate billionaires’ donations control our politicians and their votes on bills and programs that affect all of us. Since the U.S. Supreme Court will not put limits on this massive form of corruption, it is more important now more than ever that we do our own research in choosing who we elect to represent us.

This year, let’s

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Oct.
29th

ELECTION: The left benefits from court decision, too

Re: “Big campaign money, lurking in the shadows” (TNT, 10-28).

Poor Timothy Egan. The Supreme Court did not rule the way he wanted on one case (Citizens United), and now America is doomed, as he sees it, for we will never have “free and fair” elections ever again.

Methinks Egan is being scared by his own ideological shadow and should manfully buck up. Nobody ever gets every decision they want from our nine Supremes.

Furthermore, it’s not like Citizens United only helps right-leaning billionaires, like the Koch brothers, but not any left-leaning ones, as George Soros. Or does Egan

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Oct.
27th

ELECTION: Eliminate outside money influx

Re: “Sleazy campaign ads reflect poorly on candidates” (editorial, 10-24).

I’d only add that you wrote the editorial one day too soon, otherwise you would have taken note of the most recent ad from the “independent” supporters of Tami Green portraying Steve O’Ban as a greedy pig.

It’s time the huge influx of outside money is eliminated, and I believe that it could be done by enacting campaign finance law that adheres to two simple, common-sense principles.

The first is that only those eligible to vote for a candidate, or on an issue, should be allowed to donate money

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Oct.
22nd

ELECTION: Conservatives reap what they sow

A recent letter (TNT, 10-20) decries liberal billionaires for funding Initiative 594. The irony is sweet seeing that recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings allowing unlimited political funding were instituted by a court majority appointed by conservative Republican presidents.

The Republican mantra of deregulation played a huge role in the rise of the billionaire class that’s now stepping forward in an unprecedented way to control the political process. We reap what we sow.

March
17th

ELECTIONS: Let’s take back our democracy

The News Tribune raises a valid concern in calling for electronic disclosure of Senate campaign contributions (editorial, 3-16). In the current environment of huge campaign contributions by wealthy individuals and corporations, timely disclosure gives the public some inkling of who is funding elections – or should I say, who is buying our elected officials?

But the real issue is the campaign contributions themselves. Big money is absolutely corrupting our political process. Shockingly, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled (2010, Citizens United vs. FEC) that corporations are people and money is speech! This defies common logic and has opened the

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Nov.
29th

ELECTIONS: We need to get big money out of politics

Re “How to get our voices – and our dream – back” (letter, 11-25).

The word “mandatory” leaped out at me in this letter. It’s a challenging word when we rugged individualist Washington voters talk politics, but as the writer points out, it is sometimes necessary to make something happen.

Taxes for schools, roads, police, parks etc. – these we accept as mandatory. Shouldn’t “mandatory” apply to the perhaps more basic public concern: maintaining a fair electoral system to make these good things happen? I believe it should.

There is an organization in Washington state that is geared to

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Dec.
21st

TACOMA: City Council acts to correct an evil

Although it is not as emotional an issue as gun control, we will all be affected by the Tacoma City Council’s recent passage of the resolution that states corporations are not people with constitutional rights. It was a big step in the right direction.

A majority of the council realized that this was part of a larger action showing nationwide support for a constitutional amendment to help get big money out of politics.

Constitutional amendments are not easy to accomplish, but we’re on the way now. It is reassuring that the council majority “got” the beyond-local aspects of this action.

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Oct.
29th

VOTING: Elect president through popular vote

The 1787 Constitutional Convention designed an electoral college that is being used by today’s candidates in a way that disenfranchises many voters.

What may have been the best they could do in Colonial days gives disproportional weight to the voters in small states by as much as 4 to 1. Voters in swing states barraged by media blitzkriegs of ads and automated phone calls willingly sell their votes in exchange for government projects and grants.

Election campaigns are so expensive that candidates sell their souls to win elections. Many voters don’t believe their vote counts, let alone makes a difference.

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