Letters to the Editor

Your views in 250 words or less

Tag: Bangor

Jan.
29th

NUKES: Officers’ cheating reflects lax mentality

Re: “Cheating on nuke exams endemic” (TNT, 1-26).

Many officers who hold the keys to nuclear weapons cheated on proficiency tests, and this has been a major problem for decades. Air Force officials attempted to downplay this problem saying that “there is no potential for a nuclear mistake because several backup procedures are in place.”

We Puget Sound area residents wonder whether this endemic cheating mentality is present in the naval officers who manage the nuclear warheads at the Navy’s Bangor Trident submarine base near Bremerton. And we wonder whether dishonesty is linked with complacency, which could result in

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March
8th

WAR: Where’s coverage of pro-peace efforts?

The regional economic powerhouse, the Department of Defense and its contractors – the “Military Industrial Complex” (MIC) – employ many thousands in our region, putting bacon on the table for a large percentage of families. So it is easy to understand why The News Tribune and other regional newspapers give substantial news coverage and deference in support of the MIC. However, this is not balanced and objective news reporting.

Many members of local and regional anti-war and anti-nuclear arms peace organizations, including Pacific Life Community and Pax Christi Tahoma, recently held a retreat that included a presentation at the University

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April
4th

BANGOR: Protesters deserve our thanks

Thanks to Father Bill Bichsel, Father Steve Kelly, Sister Anne Montgomery, Lynne Greenwald and Susan Crane for reminding us of the nuclear warheads at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor near Silverdale.

There is substantially more nuclear warhead firepower at the naval base and the nearby Indian Island nuclear storage area than the firepower of the atomic bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. If even one of these nuclear warheads detonated, the explosive force and radiation would cause a tremendous number of fatalities, injuries and illnesses to those who live in the Puget Sound region.

Why do we tolerate this situation

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Dec.
29th

NUKES: There’s a better way to peace

As someone who has lived with the Rev. Bill Bichsel in the Catholic Worker community, has been to jail with him and knows his associates, I want to respectfully take issue with the editorial board’s perception that he and associates live in a “wishful thinking world” (editorial, 12-15).

To the contrary, they all live and serve in the “real world” of hunger, poverty and homelessness in a nation that trusts in instruments of violence and spends way over half its discretionary budget on arms instead of on human needs.

Bichsel and his associates, in my view, are prophets who have

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Dec.
15th

NUKES: The Bangor Five raise important issue

It is rare that we question whether moral law ever trumps manmade law.

But this last week, five people’s action raised that question for citizens to think about when they went on trial for entering Bangor submarine base. The federal court ruled that only the question of the violation of manmade law such as trespassing and destroying property would be considered.

We know there is such a thing as just-war principles stating that innocent citizens shall not be killed or maimed, but apparently it does not enter into the legal system.

So I guess it is up to each individual

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Dec.
14th

NUKES: Protesters trying to save us from ourselves

Last year, five anti-nuclear war protesters broke into the Kitsap-Bangor Sub Base, where they put up banners for peace. Their intent was to challenge the legality and morality of the storage and use of nuclear weapons of mass destruction. Now, in Tacoma’s federal court, a jury has found them them guilty for their action.

Their action was both a civil disobedience and an effort to save us from ourselves. Each of the eight Trident subs at Bangor house up to 24 Trident II D5 SSBN missiles, each missile with eight WW88 atomic warheads, each warhead with 475 kilotons of

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