Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Archives: May 2015

May
29th

POLICE: Little wonder that Baltimore’s bloodier

Re: ”Baltimore getting bloodier with fewer arrests” (TNT, 5-29).

This article really caught my eye. My first reaction was “Duh.” What do people expect?

Everyone who knows nothing about police work wants to get into the officers’ back pocket and dissect everything they do. Then, when they do something that doesn’t look right, they want the officer(s) jailed and strung up.

I keep hearing the tree-huggers saying profiling is not right, yet they constantly profile the police. Cop makes a mistake, they are all a bunch of crazy killers.

A bad guy does something wrong, and it takes month for

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May
29th

PAY: Big wage hike may equal no wage

Our company of 10 employees has for almost 40 summers employed high school and college students as a way to help these first-time workers learn working skills. That ends if there is a substantial minimum wage increase. A business is paid what its product or services are worth to the public. An artificially inflated wage for unskilled workers will actually be regressive.

The current concept seems to assume that small/micro businesses are the same as the bad actor big-box stores. I personally resent that simplistic attitude. As with most small/micro businesses, I treat my employees very well, almost like family,

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May
29th

COUNTY: Proposed building an ill-conceived misadventure

Re: “Pierce County general service building can’t be saved” (Matt Driscoll column, 5-28).

If only we common folk were as enlightened as Driscoll and our county potentate and executive, Pat McCarthy. If so, we taxpayers would see the grand plan and future for our county if only we would go along with plans to build the glass and plastic square box on the hill known as “the general service building.”

Why would we be against it, for heavens sake? Originally at a cost of $60 million, or was it $90? Jumping to $130 million. Now it is a “$230

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May
29th

TESTS: Superintendents suggest that science doesn’t count

Re: “Biology test shouldn’t prevent students’ graduation” (Viewpoint, 5-28).

I agree with the superintendents regarding the need to end high-stakes testing. No Child Left Behind was more a punishment of schools and teachers than an incentive for education improvement.

But their analysis that somehow biology is unnecessary suggests that what students know as they enter the world of work is less important than the graduation rate. And then they as much as said that.

As a former science teacher in Tacoma, I can guarantee that students failing biology probably did not pass chemistry or geology and certainly not zoology,

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May
28th

PAY: Are we pro-family or not?

The economic outcome for many is either a lack of work or not enough compensation. Living a healthy, stable life and starting or growing a family is awfully challenging for those without work or with inadequate compensation.

A pro-family society does what it takes to make sure the vital cell of society, the family, is protected, esteemed and has the means necessary for flourishing.

Economically speaking, we make sure people have the resources needed for starting and growing a family. If the amount of family wage jobs remains insufficient, then we provide assistance. If private and religious charity are not enough

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May
28th

PAY: Don’t mandate higher minimum wage

Government mandating small businesses to raise their labor cost by increasing the minimum wage hurts everyone. Can the government legislate an increase in sales? No. Something must give.

Marginal businesses and marginal employees go first. And where do these ex-workers and owners go? They go on the dole. Who pays? You and I.

Many of the remaining employed get their hours reduced. Their disposable income diminishes.

Demand decreases if small businesses raise their prices to offset higher labor costs. Sales fall. More businesses go under. Price increases can also shatter the poor’s already precarious purchasing power.

Further, an increase in

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May
27th

TACOMA: Community discussions are vital

I applaud The News Tribune for inviting community leaders in for a discussion (Karen Peterson column, 5-24) to avoid a flare-up that we’ve seen in many other cities recently regarding police and community relations.

Recently, at City Club of Tacoma, we had a program titled “Can Ferguson Happen in Tacoma?” The News Tribune and City Club invited some of the same community leaders, such as Lyle Quasim and Tacoma Police Chief Don Ramsdell. But we had one additional, and in my opinion, key player involved: Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist.

Lindquist was a vital part of our program, lending his

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May
27th

PARKS: Our state parks deserve adequate funding

Our 102-year-old state parks system is one of the oldest and most diverse in the nation and contributes to the health and well-being of our citizens. And its 3 million-plus annual visitors add mightily to the $21.6 billion outdoor recreation economy, especially important in rural areas.

In recent years, overall funding has been reduced significantly. While we kept all parks open, it came at a price. Park level customer services, education, interpretive programs, routine maintenance and safety all suffered noticeably, and our deferred maintenance backlog is nearly $500 million.

Currently state lawmakers are deciding on funding levels for state parks

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