Letters to the Editor

Your views in 200 words or less

Archives: Sep. 2012

Sep.
27th

TNT: Use Facebook now to comment on letters

Note to readers:

We usually enjoy getting reader comments on the letters to the editor and Inside Opinion blogs. Many of those comments are insightful, cogent, pithy and humorous. Sometimes we are alerted to mistakes or more information we might want to take into account.

But all too many comments – particularly those made anonymously – are cruel, off-topic and sometimes downright obscene. They tend to discourage commenters who are interested in a civil conversation, and we’ve heard from readers that they no longer submit letters because of the nasty comments that inevitably are posted.

To address the problem, we’ve switched to Facebook commenting. You now use your Facebook account to post comments online at blogs.thenewstribune.com/letters (the letters blog) and blogs.thenewstribune.com/opinion (the Inside Opinion blog). Readers also can share their comment with their Facebook friends by checking a “post to Facebook” box below the comment field.

Editor Karen Peterson wrote a column in July explaining the reasons for the switch, which took place earlier in other sections of the paper. Here’s some of what she wrote: Read more »

Sep.
27th

EDUCATION: World Bank reneges on pledge

I was encouraged to read the article (thenewstribune.com, 9-21) on the first lady of Qatar who is energetically speaking out on the behalf of 61 million kids who are completely deprived of any education at all.

What is under the public radar is the fact that the World Bank has quietly reneged on its pledge to increase funding for basic education by $750 million over the next five years.

Surrounded by celebrities and politicians at the U.N. General Assembly in 2010, the World Bank president and managing director boldly announced that the bank would substantially increase its lending for

Read more »

Sep.
27th

BUSES: Many depend on public transit

Re: Pierce County Proposition 1.

I am mother to two wonderful girls. All of us have visual impairments and depend on the buses to get around. My youngest, who is a senior at the Washington State School for the Blind in Vancouver, will be the hardest hit if Proposition 1 doesn’t pass.

She comes home on the weekend via charter bus. If her bus is late on Friday and comes in after the buses stop running, she is stuck at the stop where the charter bus drops her off. On Sunday we would have to rely on other people to

Read more »

Sep.
26th

ELECTION: Letter example of smear campaign

Re: “Romney can’t lead by example” (letter, 9-19).

The News Tribune constantly gets letters from people who don’t have their facts straight. Who really led by example?

Mitt Romney was not born into a wealthy family. George Romney was the general manager of the Automobile Manufacturing Association when Romney was born. This was a good job, but he wasn’t rich. It wasn’t until later in the 1950s that he became wealthy.

George Romney passed along a high set of values to his sons. By comparison, Joseph Kennedy made a large fortune in finance and left trust funds to all

Read more »

Sep.
26th

BUSES: Don’t leave riders stranded

Pierce Transit is an important part of my everyday life. I use Pierce Transit for school, doctor appointments and important community events. I also use it to access Oasis Youth Center, which is only open in the late afternoons and evenings.

Oasis is a very important resource to me, and it’s one of the ways I connect with my peers. If Pierce Transit services are cut, I would face difficulties getting home at night from my classes in Seattle.

I was born and raised in Tacoma, and I would like to continue living here, but if services are cut I

Read more »

Sep.
26th

ECONOMY: Growth hurt by redistribution

Rewarding businesses that provide society with the products and services they want is fundamental to economic vibrancy.

Apple Inc., the world’s largest company by market capitalization, recently released the newest version of its iconic Smartphone: iPhone 5. Preorders topped 2 million in the first 24 hours. It will give a massive boost to suppliers and derivative companies; indeed, JPMorgan estimates it could add about 0.5 percent to the nation’s GDP on an annualized basis.

Should public servants determine that Apple’s executives, or any brilliant innovators who create wealth for society, have “made enough money”? Is the government more efficient than

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Sep.
26th

PUYALLUP: School funds being wisely spent?

The announced February 2013 bond levy election for the Puyallup School District (TNT, 8-29), left me asking, “Gee, aren’t we still in a recession? Aren’t higher property taxes the last thing we need in this
economy?”

I thought yes to both, but evidently members on the Puyallup School Board didn’t.

Let’s take a look at the recently negotiated contract with Superintendent Tim Yeomans and how the school board spent our money.

Yeomans receives an annual base salary of $189,400. Additionally, he will receive $7,000 annually for his superintendent credentials and doctorate degree. Also to be added: an additional

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Sep.
26th

COLLEGE: We once had education that worked

Re: “State college-going: Sinking, not treading water” (editorial, 9-25).

“Sinking” state college enrollment results from two factors: greatly reduced funding of state colleges and ending the three-decade post-WWII placement of K-12 students in classrooms according to national achievement test scores, intelligence tests and teacher observation.

Federal and state college funding enabled my baby boomer generation, many working class, to attend college. And such student placement meant more students were accurately assessed and teacher-evaluated in classrooms because students of like achievement and learning speed were grouped together. More students were prepared for college.

Cold War-era education was considered critical to

Read more »