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9/11: A remnant from the South Tower

Letter by Gene Edgar Harvey, Puyallup on Sep. 25, 2012 at 3:29 pm with 24 Comments »
September 25, 2012 3:29 pm

Recently I read about a newly discovered remnant from 9/11 that temporarily stopped my blood from circulating. The tragic event of 9/11 stunned humanity’s imagination, caused the Earth to pause from its rotation, sent stark ripples through the universe and witnessed God blinking.

This past August, as a result of forensic evidence and a seemingly miraculous process of spiritual influence, Denise Scott learned the nature of her husband’s last moments at the top of the South Tower (Tower Two) in the World Trade Center. The surviving note, which was identified through analysis of a thumb-size blotch of blood, read:

84th Floor
West Office
12 people trapped

The Scott Family graciously allowed this final note from their husband and father, Randy, be displayed at the 9/11 Memorial Museum. According to Jan Ramirez, chief curator, “I believe it will be one of the most powerful artifacts in the museum.”

Immersed in our busy daily routines, sometime important events such as the 9/11 attack slip away from our awareness amidst the over stimulation of activity. Stories like this prompt us to momentarily pause and remember that all is not well and good in the world.

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Leave a comment Comments → 24
  1. Frankenchrist says:

    Agreed. That story chilled me to the core. Sometimes the small human touches do that.

  2. More will eventually come to light and will be even more chilling.

  3. bobcat1a says:

    “Recently I read about a newly discovered remnant from 9/11 that temporarily stopped my blood from circulating. The tragic event of 9/11 stunned humanity’s imagination, caused the Earth to pause from its rotation, sent stark ripples through the universe and witnessed God blinking.”
    Hyperbolic nonsense.

  4. Even FC managed to show a modicum of class, then BC1 steps in.

  5. itwasntmethistime says:

    Entire cities, not just buildings, have been reduced to smithereens all over the world, throughout the history of warfare, and because this one time it happened on US soil you think it’s more significant than any other attack? It is truly horrific that 3000 people died in that attack, but why is that more horrific than the 25,000 people who died when London was bombed in WW2?

    That’s the arrogance much of the world hates.

  6. buddyandelliott says:

    Chance in an amazing thing, and the chances of this note being found was high because of the obsessive way we’ve sifted through every tiny piece of rubble. I mean really? Finding and identifying bone fragments to return to family members? Why are we spending money on this?

  7. itwasntmethistime says:

    The earthquake in Haiti in 2010 claimed between 250,000 and 300,000 lives. Almost all of the bodies were shoved into mass graves with bulldozers. Why are the bones of those 300,000 people less valuable than the bones of our 3000 dead?

  8. The first paragraph of the letter was a rather unfortunate journey into aggrandized poesy. The rest of the letter I appreciated.

  9. commoncents says:

    It’s not that these people are any more or less important than others who were killed in various disasters or that they attack was any more or less horrific than other historical attacks – it is quite simply this….they were OUR people. I would hope that those in England, Haiti, Phuket, and any other area that had to endure significant losses would feel the same about their own dead…when we lose those closest to us the pain IS greater and the need for SOMETHING to help us get some closure is greater.

  10. itwasntmethistime says:

    I agree, it’s perspective. Of course this hurts us more because it’s closer.

    But to say the world changed that day — no, it didn’t. It’s not even right to say the US changed that day. Really, life only changed for those who had the arrogance to think nothing could ever happen to us, for the simple reason that they’ve lived in the protected, cushioned US their whole lives and assume everyone everywhere is this safe.

    I guess we should thank the military for doing such a good job that half the people in this country are clueless about what a good job they are doing.

  11. averageJose says:

    Reading the comments on this thread provides much insight into the minds of the authors.

  12. It was the nature of the attack that made this what it was,and what it remains. A sneak attack targeting innocent civilians…it shocked the world, and while the letter-writer’s opening lines may not be good poetry, the point remains that 9/11 rocked the world.

  13. fanciladi says:

    I agree, averageJose, and the insight he mentions leaves a lot to be desired…for most of them, thankfully not all.

    We must never for 9-11…never! It’s right up there with Pearl Harbor! The attacks on our Embassyies throughout the World should not be forgotten either.

    Thank you Scott Family for sharing your treasure!

  14. itwasntmethistime says:

    sozo — I see what you are saying, that the nature of the attack makes it different. Innocent citizens were deliberately targeted instead of being collateral damage. So you think the rest of the world saw it that way as well, even though many of them hate us for thinking we are superior?

  15. commoncents says:

    I don’t think it was the nature of it so much as there have been sneak attacks on civilians on our soil before…WTC 1993? Yet we don’t honor February 26 at all.

    In my opinion – it’s a combination of the magnitude of the damage, the number of casualties, and most importantly the use of the airplanes. I think every American realized their vulnerablity that day. Not everyone works in an office building that would be targeted but I think most of us have flown and instantly became aware that WE were a target. I think much of the rest of the world also became much more aware of their own individual vulnerability that day and that’s why no one will forget.

  16. normajean says:

    The financial district was destroyed along with thousands of people. This is an American tragedy that should not be demeaned by the no more or less tragic than others around the world. On this soil & elsewhere, it changed the lives of many forever and Americans have a right to memorialise this tragedy as they see fit without the negativity being spewed from less compassionate individuals.

  17. itwasntmethistime says:

    norma — Everything can’t be the worst tragedy ever. Even my small children understand less and more. This is a discussion forum. If you can’t handle considering other opinions when you share yours, you’re going to get a whole bunch of negativity directed right at you because these guys on here like to gang up on the weak.

    commoncents — I’ve never been to Europe but I hear their airports are, and have always been, protected by armed guards. So maybe the rest of the world DOES understand we are vulnerable all the time.

  18. BlaineCGarver says:

    America haters just have to do what comes naturally.

  19. itwasntmethistime says:

    BCG — Of course they do. That’s kind of what I’m getting at. America haters have always been in the picture. This tragedy caught so many Americans off guard, but it didn’t seem to surprise the rest of the world because they live with the reality that anything can happen at any time. I’m not going to say I saw this coming, but I’m also not in disbelief that after years and years of problems with various entities in the Middle East they decided to flex their muscles one day to show us that they don’t care about playing by our rules.

    So now they’re busy planning their next surprise attack in the future and we’re caught in the past thinking it’s all going to be better when all the bone fragments are identified.

    Remember. Memorialize. Do everything you want to honor the 9/11 victims. But don’t forget that the ball is still in play.

  20. took14theteam says:

    “But don’t forget that the ball is still in play.”

    By the religion of PEACE…..

  21. normajean says:

    @itwasntmethistime. ”Gang up on the weak”. Still laughing but don’t you worry as this French Canadian broad can tango with the best of them. I was working for Merrill Lynch in Montreal at the time of 9/11. We had people in the financial sector. Yes it touched us all & again I must reiterate that people have a right to mourn as they see fit. That being said, what relevance is there in trying to determine how the events of 9/11 compare to other tragedies around the world. Why it happened is a whole new issue worthy of discussion

  22. itwasntmethistime says:

    No, you didn’t write that people have a right to mourn as they wish, you wrote that people have a right to mourn without negativity from others. Not the same. You also insinuated that people who don’t think 9/11 was the worst thing that ever happened in the whole wide world lack compassion.

  23. normajean says:

    @itwasntmethistime. You expect me to go toe to toe with someone who misinterprets what was said to suit his or her own ”negative” comments.

    ”You also insinuated that people who don’t think 9/11 was the worst thing that ever happened in the whole wide world lack compassion.” Not true as I said ”This is an American tragedy that should not be demeaned by the no more or less tragic than others around the world.” No where did I mention that it was the ”worst thing that ever happened.”

    ”Americans have a right to memorialise this tragedy as they see fit without the negativity being spewed from less compassionate individuals.” I did not say nor insinuate “that people who don’t think 9/11 was the worst thing that ever happened in the whole wide world lack compassion.” Less does not mean lack. Having the right to mourn without negativity as one sees fit is a matter of respect which is lacking from Westboro Baptist Church protesters, for example, who demonstrate at military funerals. It is all about respect. Enough said as I won’t allow this to become a bitching session about semantics.

  24. averageJose says:

    Some people HAVE to make it about semantics.

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