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The Doobie Brothers added to fair line-up

Post by Craig Sailor / The News Tribune on April 23, 2012 at 1:49 pm |
April 23, 2012 1:49 pm

The Doobie Brothers
The Puyallup Fair hasn’t yet finished filling in the gaps in their entertainment line-up. Veteran rockers The Doobie Brothers will be performing there on Sept. 19. Tickets go on sale on Saturday, April 28 at 10 a.m.

The group, with 16 albums and hit songs, “Black Water,” “What a Fool Believes,” “Real Love,” and “Long Train Running,” has been around since the 1970s. Though the band’s makeup (including Michael McDonald) has changed over the years founding members Tom Johnston and Pat Simmons are still the writers and lead vocalists for the group.

The Doobie Brothers will perform on Wednesday, Sept. 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the Puyallup Fair & Events Center. Tickets go on sale Saturday, April 28 at 10 a.m. on the Fair website, www.thefair.com/concerts or by phone 888-559-FAIR (3247), daily, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. PST. To save the convenience charges, purchase tickets in person at the Puyallup Fair & Events Center box office at 9th Avenue SW and Meridian Street on Saturdays, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., and Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets are reserved seating and include Fair gate admission.

More from the announcement:

The group started back in 1969 when drummer John Hartman arrived in California, and soon after was introduced to singer, guitarist and songwriter Tom Johnston. They called their fledgling group Pud, and worked with several artists to find the right mix. In 1970 they signed up with bass player Dave Shogren and singer, guitarist and songwriter Patrick Simmons, and The Doobie Brothers started performing all over Northern California. At the start, they had a strong following of Hells Angels chapter members, with a sound their audience loved.

In 1974 that sound changed to their trademark amalgam of R&B, country, bluegrass, hard rock, roadhouse boogie, fun and rock and roll. The release of The Captain and Me brought with it “Long Train Runnin’” and “China Grove.” The group’s first #1 hit, “Black Water” was a signature song of Simmons’ that same year when Vices was released.

In the spring of 1975 a singer, songwriter and keyboardist Michael McDonald joined the group, and became an important part of their sound. Takin’ It to the Streets had a softer rock and blue-eyed soul sound, emphasizing keyboards and horns and subtler, more syncopated rhythms. Their electric guitar-based rock and roll sound fell by the wayside. This new sound made them a crossover pop-R&B-rock sensation, which also put their name on the charts more frequently.

By 1978 their most successful album, Minute by Minute was released. It spent five weeks at the top of the music charts and was on heavy rotation on radio stations for two solid years. “What a Fool Believes,” written by McDonald and Kenny Loggins, was the band’s second No 1 single on the Billboard chart. In 1980 the song received a Grammy Award for Record of the Year, and The Doobie Brothers received another Grammy for Pop Vocal Performance by a Group.

The next decade brought more albums, including One Step Closer, which was certified Platinum, and produced the Top 10 hit, “Real Love.” Shortly after that the group elected to disband, and the Farewell Tour took place in 1982. After a five-year hibernation, the group reformed and successful reunions took place. Their popularity continues, with the group providing the half-time entertainment for the FedEx Orange Bowl football game on January 1, 2009. For further information, visit their official website at www.doobiebrothers.net.

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