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Bundy’s DNA now in the national database

Post by Stacey Mulick / The News Tribune on Aug. 8, 2011 at 2:23 pm |
August 8, 2011 2:29 pm

The DNA profile of serial killer Ted Bundy has been added to a national database where it can be compared to evidence from unsolved cases.

Bundy’s profile was uploaded into the FBI-run database Friday, said Keith Kameg, spokesman for Florida Department of Law Enforcement. The database contains DNA profiles of about 10 million convicted felons.

The department has not been notified that Bundy’s DNA matches any unsolved cases, Kameg said Monday.

“We are waiting the results,” he said.

Law enforcement officials hope the addition of Bundy’s DNA to the national database solves some cold cases or eliminates him in slayings that’s been tied to over the years.

That includes the 1961 disappearance of 8-year-old Ann Marie Burr from her North End Tacoma home. Bundy has long been considered a suspect in the disappearance. He was a teenager in Tacoma at the time.

Bundy, 42, was executed in Florida in 1989 for the slayings of two sorority sisters and a 12-year-old girl. Right before his death, he confessed to killing 30 women, including 11 in Washington, during a cross-country spree in the 1970s. Law enforcement officials have not been able to identify all 30 women and have long believed he was responsible for many more.

Bundy’s crimes occurred before the creation of state and national DNA databases.

For the past decade or so, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement had a partial DNA profile for Bundy but it wasn’t complete enough to upload into the national database.

In December, Tacoma police homicide detective Lindsey Wade picked up the Ann Marie Burr case and started researching whether Bundy’s DNA was in the national database. When she discovered it wasn’t, she contacted the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

The phone calls renewed the search to get Bundy’s DNA into the national database.

David Coffman, lab director for the Tallahassee, Fla., regional crime lab, found a vial of Bundy’s blood that was taken when he was arrested in 1978. The lab was able to get a complete DNA profile from the sample and have it loaded into the national database.

“This type of case symbolizes how investigations are changing,” Kameg said. “Evidence that was a dead end years ago now has the ability to solve a crime.”

Last week, Wade submitted evidence taken from Ann Marie’s disappearance to the state crime lab to see if it contained DNA of a suspect in the case. The evidence has never been analyzed.

The results could take a couple of months.

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