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Tag: Rialto theater Tacoma

March
29th

Critic’s Picks: Edible Book Fest at UPS, Pam Ingalls at Brick House, new work at American Art Co and Mark O’Connor fiddling the Rialto

image004Edible books at UPS

Yes, you can have your book at eat it too. The University of Puget Sound’s annual Edible Book Festival is on again this Monday in the Collins library, spurring dozens of highly competitive and wacky entries from “Much Andouille About Nothing” to “Of Rice and Hen.” It’s part of the international Edible Book Festival. The categories are extensive – including Most Humorous, Most Geautiful, Most Delicious and Creeps Me Out – and the only rules are that it be (mostly) edible and inspired by a book. The festival is held April 1. Entry drop-off 8-11 a.m., show hours 11 a.m.-4 p.m., awards ceremony 3:30-4 p.m. with light refreshments (but, alas, no book eating). Free. Collins Memorial Library, University of Puget Sound, 1500 N. Warner St., Tacoma. pugetsound.edu, books2eat.com

Pam Ingalls’ paintings at Brick House

Pam Ingalls shows still lifes, landscapes and nudes painted in the Russian Impressionist style with deep vivid colors and loose brushwork at Brick House Gallery. 5-9 p.m. third Thursdays and by appointment. Free. Brick House Gallery, 1123 S. Fawcett St., Tacoma. 253-627-0426, thebrickhousegallery.com

New work at American Art Co. Read more »

Feb.
14th

Northwest Sinfonietta gives U.S. premiere of a newly-discovered strings-only accompaniment for Beethoven’s fourth piano concerto, with Andreas Klein as soloist in Seattle, Tacoma and Puyallup

Pianist Andreas Klein will play solo with the Northwest Sinfonietta this weekend. Courtesy photo.
Pianist Andreas Klein will play solo with the Northwest Sinfonietta this weekend. Courtesy photo.

It’s not your usual Beethoven concerto, but then the Northwest Sinfonietta prides itself on doing new twists on standards. This weekend the Tacoma-based chamber orchestra gives the U.S. premiere of a strings-only version of the composer’s fourth piano concerto with German soloist Andreas Klein.

Found recently in Bonn, Germany and passed onto Klein, the reduced orchestral accompaniment by Beethoven editor Hans-Werner Küthen might be new to U.S. audiences but would have been second nature for 19th-century music lovers. In the era before music recordings, orchestras in every town and oodles of conservatory-trained musicians, if you wanted to hear a classic you sometimes had to play it yourself with whatever instruments were to hand. Piano reductions of Mozart operas, trio versions of symphonies – this was common stuff.

Arranging for different instruments also solves a very contemporary problem – money. For the Sinfonietta and everyone else, it’s much cheaper to play a Beethoven concert with around 20 string players than it is to pay seven extra woodwinds, four brass players and a timpanist as well. Read more »

Dec.
17th

The Christmas Revels in medieval Haddon Hall (aka Tacoma’s Rialto) is full of joy, marvelous music and spirits of the best kind.


The Christmas Revels. From left: Harold Smelt, Tony Curry, Keith Dahlgren, Sophie Clements and Kate Witt. Courtesy photo.

It’s the 20th anniversary of the Puget Sound Revels, and so you’d expect a bigger production than most years. What you get, though, in this year’s Christmas Revels – set in 12th century England, and performed in Tacoma’s Rialto Theater – is a professional production that has the best music, most interesting plot and highest production values of any Revels in the last eight years.

Creating a professional-looking Revels isn’t easy. All but a few of the cast are amateurs who rehearse their folk-songs and dances after their day-job is over, and there’s a children’s chorus (16-strong this year), many of whom have never been on stage before. Sets are built by family members, costumes are sewn by friends. Even the paid musicians are sometimes a grab-bag.

But this year it all comes together with a resounding hurrah. Most successful of all is the plot, something the folk-tradition-based Revels doesn’t often come with, and this is spun out with engaging skill by five talented actors. Read more »

Dec.
14th

Critic’s Picks: Illumni Chorale at PLU, “Messiah,” Magical Strings at Rialto and Northwest Repertory Singers

Christmas with Illumni chorale at PLU

The Illumni Men’s Chorale present “An American Christmas,” with both traditional and brand-new carols premiering live on YouTube during the concert. Tickets are free, support for this can be given at christmasshouldbefree.org. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 16. Lagerquist Hall, Pacific Lutheran University, 868 Wheeler St. S, Tacoma. 206-659-5894, illumnimenschorale.com

TSO Chorus sings a different “Messiah” Read more »

Dec.
5th

Tacoma Concert Band Decks the Rialto for the holidays

Don’t forget the brass this Christmas – musical brass, that is. The brass, wind and percussion of the Tacoma Concert Band are presenting their first holiday concert in over 20 years this Sunday in the intimate acoustics of the downtown Rialto Theater.

Featuring mezzo-soprano Dawn Padula, voice professor at the University of Puget Sound, as guest artist, the program ranges through Christmas, Chanukah and holiday music arranged by composers from Leroy Anderson, Irving Berlin and Adolphe Adam to Charles Gounod and J. S. Bach, including and several arrangements recorded by Mannheim Steamroller.

The concert will also be recorded

Read more »

Oct.
12th

Critic’s Picks: “Ramayana” at ACT, Seattle Art Museum’s “Elles,” Seattle Opera’s “Fidelio” and Fireworks at the Rialto

See the “Ramayana” live at ACT

ACT’s multi-discipline adaptation of the Hindu epic “The Ramayana” begins preview this week before opening next week. Featuring actors, dancers, music and puppetry the play tells the age-old South and South East Asian love story of the Hindu gods Rama and Sita. Previews 8 p.m. tonight and Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 14, 16,17; then opens 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18 through Nov. 12. From $37.50/$20 under-25/$15 students. Senior discounts. ACT, 700 Union St., Seattle. 206-292-7676, acttheatre.org

SAM hosts an “Elles” community night out

Seattle Art Museum is opening up the touring show “Elles: Women Artists from the Pompidou, Paris” free this Friday with a community night out event that includes local performances by the Chinese Community Drill Team, Pecha Kucha presenters, Skin Deep Dance, Northwest Girl Choir and Rain City Rock Camp for Girls. The Paris show of artists like Cindy Sherman and the Guerilla Girls is complemented by “Elles: SAM” from the museum’s collection. 6-9 p.m. tonight. Free. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 1st Ave., Seattle. 206-654-31000, seattleartmuseum.org Read more »

Oct.
8th

Joyful, uniting music at Northwest Sinfonietta’s historic “Cuban” concert in Rialto Theater, Tacoma


Jesús Carnero de la Teja conducts the Northwest Sinfonietta in the Cuban national anthem in the Rialto Theater Saturday night. Photo: Rosemary Ponnekanti

It was a moment few could have predicted back in 1959 (or even more recently than Cuba’s revolution) – 800 Americans standing in honor while a Cuban conductor led American musicians through the Cuban national anthem, both countries’ flags flanking the stage. But that’s exactly what happened Saturday night at Tacoma’s Rialto Theater, and Friday night in Seattle’s Benaroya Hall, and yesterday at Pioneer Park Pavilion, Puyallup, with all three venues seeing packed, enthusiastic houses for a first-ever concert of Cubans playing side by side with Americans in this country. The orchestra was, of course, the Northwest Sinfonietta, whose January Cuba tour sparked off the whole exchange, and who played with most of their usual panache and skill in a program of Beethoven and Lecuona.

In Tacoma, the music came after an official proclamation of “Northwest Sinfonietta Day” by Mayor Marilyn Strickland, and a welcome. Strickland conducted her way through the U.S. national anthem without mishap, and then Cuban violist Jesús Carnero de la Teja took the baton for the Cuban anthem. After three dances by Ernesto Lecuona, the “Cuban Gershwin,” which showed both Lecuona’s flair for ineffable orchestration and a sultry, dramatic flair from the musicians, Carnero again took the podium from director Christophe Chagnard to lead “Danzon Ragon” by Cuban pianist Andrés Alen. Under Carnero’s deft leadership, which also included some suave dancing and inviting the audience to clap along, the bossa nova featured a strong percussion section and smooth brass solos. The Cuban string players also got to lead their respective sections, which was a nice gesture.

And then hot Havana humidity gave way to Germanic Sturm-und-Drang, as Beethoven’s Symphony no. 9 began. Read more »

April
25th

Cellist David Requiro plays with Northwest Sinfonietta in classical program at Seattle’s Benaroya Hall, Tacoma’s Rialto Theater and Puyallup’s Pioneer Pavilion


Cellist David Requiro, soloist with the Northwest Sinfonietta. Courtesy photo.

When you think classical, you might think Mozart, Haydn, even Beethoven. But this weekend the Northwest Sinfonietta want you to think Prokofiev and Mendelssohn. For their concerts in Seattle, Tacoma and Puyallup the Tacoma-based chamber orchestra is playing a program that goes from the early 19th to the early 20th centuries – way later than the standard classical time-period – but includes two composers that took inspiration from the late 18th century, plus a cello concerto with stunning local soloist David Requiro.

Sergei Prokofiev opens the program, the Soviet-era composer who reinvented classical form and balance with modern harmonies and dissonances. His Symphony no. 1 is called “The Classical” for a good reason: a tribute to Haydn, it dances through 18th-century styles like the gavotte and sonata form with precision and grace, without any of the heavy depression of his later works. Read more »