GO Arts

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Tag: circus

June
4th

“Kings’ Wish” at Teatro Zinzanni gives the littlies a fun time at the circus – though with more singing than spectacle.

Chris Ballew (aka Caspar Babypants) plays for a kiddie crowd at Teatro Zinzanni. Photo courtesy Teatro Zinzanni.
Chris Ballew (aka Caspar Babypants) plays for a kiddie crowd at Teatro Zinzanni. Photo courtesy Teatro Zinzanni.

If you’ve ever taken a date to the chaotic circus cabaret Teatro Zinzanni in Seattle – or even if you haven’t – you’ll appreciate the fact that it’s rare to get a circus that’s just as much fun for really little kids. Or at the right time. Or the right length. Or for a ticket price that won’t make you cringe. Parents – Teatro Zinzanni presents “King’s Wish,” to solve all those problems and entertain your littlies with a show that’s a circus and a mosh-pit all in one. Even better, the kid-themed show, which just opened last weekend at Zinzanni’s indoor ‘tent’ near the Seattle Center, actually has kids performing in it, and they’re phenomenal.

The only downside – and it’s a biggie – is that anyone over the age of six will probably be bored half the time.

“King’s Wish” markets itself as an all-ages show, and if you glance over the star acts you’ll be tempted to bring older children. Among the stellar adult performers (acrobat-aerialist Terry Crane, former Pacific Northwest Ballet principal Ariana Lallone) and the musical headline act of Caspar Babypants (that’s Chris Ballew of The Presidents of the United States of America, for anyone not immersed in kindie rock) are two stunningly good child artists. One is tiny Saffi Watson, ten years old and already at professional standard at contortion, gymnastics and aerial arts. The other is Max Peterson, whom you might have seen busking at the Pike Place Markets – at eight years old he can already handle five balls and has invented nifty tricks of his own.

Trouble is, these four take up about a quarter of the hour-long morning performance. Read more »

March
20th

Indie rock trapeze: Tallhouse Arts Consortium and Romanteek collaborate at Olympia’s Capitol Theater

The Tallhouse Arts Consortium trapeze ensemble. Courtesy photo.

It’s pure Olympia onstage: a grungy, bass-heavy indie rock band with mournful female vocals next to a group of muscly dancers performing on an assortment of aerial hoops, ropes and bars. The collaboration this Saturday night of the Tallhouse Arts Consortium trapeze ensemble with live band Romanteek isn’t just a loud, starkly lit trapeze show: It’s an example of Olympia artists doing highly original things in cool venues.

It’s also the first full-length narrative show from Tallhouse, a group of Olympians who got together a few years ago after taking aerial classes in Seattle circus schools and began practicing in a refurbished barn. You may have seen them doing their high-bar stuff at the Brotherhood Lounge or the Illuminated Ball. Now they’re branching out into an evening show.

In the words of the press release: “Set in the shadows of a dense wood, a dark heart, a deep sea, the show winds through an otherworldy soundscape. Tallhouse and Romanteek entangle in the human experience of struggle and synchronicity, among a crowd, between two people, within a single self…it is music.” Read more »