GO Arts

Everything new on the walls, stage, screen and streets of Tacoma and South Puget Sound.

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Archives: Oct. 2010

Oct.
29th

Critic’s Picks: Two new shows at MoG, Marita Dingus’ giant Buddha sculpture, Rosalind Bell play at UPS and Gold from Straw theater

Museum of Glass has two new shows

Just opened at the Museum of Glass are two new exhibits: “Fertile Ground,” which displays recent works from the museum’s visiting Hot Shop artist residencies, and “Glimmering Gone,” featuring collaborative work by American Beth Lipman and Swede Ingalena Klenell.10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. third Thursdays and noon-5 p.m. Sunday through fall, 2011. $12/$10/$5 ages 6-12/free for under-six. 866-4-MUSEUM, www.museumofglass.org

Marita Dingus’ giant Buddha at UPS

Seattle artist Marita Dingus’ 60-foot sculpture “Buddha as an African enslaved,” made of wire and fabric, will process at noon today through the University of Puget

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Oct.
27th

A tale of two libraries (and the art therein): UPS’ Collins and the downtown Tacoma Public Library

 

Libraries can be great places for seeing art. They’re open long hours, are nice and quiet and often show local artists. Two Tacoma libraries are showing work right now that’s worth a long look.

Tacoma Public Library’s downtown branch shows art regularly in its Handforth Gallery (past check-out and up the short steps to the left.) This month the show is “BIG: An exploration,” which is exactly what it sounds like.

The biggest work of the lot is probably Marsah Glazière’s “Human Tapestry.” A 15-foot frieze of 10 lifesize human sculptures projecting out of a paint-and-textile collage, this work

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Oct.
26th

“Family Affair” doc a personal exploration on abuse, betrayal and forgiveness


It takes a certain amount of fortitude and patience to make a documentary – and even more when it’s about your family and their repressed secrets. Chico Colvard’s feature-length film, “Family Affair,” is a prime example. It’s a story about him and his family – and acts of abuse, betrayal and ultimately forgiveness.

The story begins in 1978 when Colvard was 10 and accidentally shot one of his sisters in the leg. Believing she was going to die, the sister told her mother and, later, the authorities that she and her two sisters had been sexually abused by their father.

That’s just the beginning, Colvard told me in a phone call this week from Boston. Local audiences can see the rest of the story Thursday in Tacoma and Friday in Olympia. Colvard will attend both screenings.
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Oct.
25th

MoG curator Melissa G. Post to leave next month

Museum of Glass curator Melissa G. Post will be resigning from her position after three years in the full-time position. She steps down on Nov. 17, citing family and personal interests as reasons for leaving the museum and relocating to the East Coast.

As the museum’s first full-time, in-house curator in five years, Post was responsible for organizing exhibitions such as last year’s Preston Singletary survey, developing the museum’s fledgling permanent collection and overseeing the Visiting Artist Residency program. She had previously worked as curator at the Mint Museum of Craft and Design in Charlotte, N.C. and at the

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Oct.
25th

Classical Orissi dance at Evergreen College

 

You don’t often get to see classical Indian dance in the South Sound – but this weekend you’ve got the chance. The Evergreen Orissi Dance Ensemble will join the Urvasi Dance Company and Fulbright-winning dance professor Ratna Roy for two performances of Orissi dance at Evergreen State College Friday and Saturday.

What’s Orissi? Originating from the tropical coastal state of Orissa in India, Orissi is one of the six classical Indian dance forms. It’s mostly a women’s dance, based around sinuous gestures with occasional leaps. Think of those curvy Indian temple sculptures and you’ll get the idea.

From the

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Oct.
22nd

Critic’s Picks: “Picasso” at SAM, weaving at the Burke Museum, Dia de los Muertos at TAM and poetry workshop

Picasso at SAM

Pablo Picasso comes to Seattle Art Museum in a big way over 150 paintings, drawing, sculptures and photographs for the first major survey of this artist in the Northwest. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday-Friday through Jan. 17, 2011. $20 adults/$20 seniors and military/$18 students and ages 13-17/free for under-12/discounts on first Thursdays and 5-9 p.m. Thursday-Friday, and for groups. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 1st Ave., Seattle. 206-654-3100, www.seattleartmuseum.org, www.picassoinseattle.org

Weaving at the Burke

The Burke Museum’s textile collection show, “Weaving Heritage,” showcases textile masterpieces from the museum’s international collection. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily,

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Oct.
21st

Tacoma vs. Seattle in art – discussion tonight at the Robert Daniel Gallery

So, what do you think – is Tacoma in Seattle’s shadow art-wise? Join the panel discussion about it at the Robert Daniel Gallery at 6 p.m. tonight. The panel’s being organized by non-profit arts resource group Shunpike.

Panelists include Broadway Center’s executive director David Fischer, letterpress artist Jessica Spring, filmmaker Aaron Jacobs, UPS art professor Elise Richman and Dawn Quinn from the Tacoma Weekly. The moderator will be Erik Hanberg of Metro Parks, who’s had a finger in many Tacoma arts pies (Horatio Theater, Grand Cinema, local plays) and who’s now volunteering with Shunpike’s Arts Leadership Lab. Should be interesting.

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Oct.
21st

Japanese bamboo and Venetian glass at Traver Gallery

 

Just up at Traver Gallery is a duo of exhibitions by three artists, each exploring ancient materials with fresh ideas and graceful skill.

Jiro Yonezawa weaves bamboo into highly textured towers, curves and twists, his minimalist elegance echoing a very Japanese version of natural beauty. The Japan native, who has recently returned home after years spent in Portland, plays with air and space in his weaving. Five “Ladybugs,” lacquered red and black to a tableware sheen, are vessels with as much space as surface, hiding within a delicate copper tube for blossom sprigs. Also vases (though they look

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