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Margaret Anderson’s name added to law enforcement memorial

Post by Jeff Mayor / The News Tribune on April 30, 2013 at 10:07 am |
April 30, 2013 11:47 am

UPDATED AT 11:44 A.M.

The name of Margaret Anderson was unveiled today on the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington, D.C. Anderson, a Mount Rainier National Park ranger, was shot and killed while on duty Jan. 1, 2012. (National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund photo)
The name of Margaret Anderson was unveiled today on the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington, D.C. Anderson, a Mount Rainier National Park ranger, was shot and killed while on duty Jan. 1, 2012. (National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund photo)

 

The engraved name of Margaret Anderson, the Mount Rainier National Park ranger killed Jan. 1, 2012, was unveiled this morning at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Also unveiled today was the name of Prince William County (Va.) Police Officer Chris Yung.

Margaret Anderson (NPS photo)
Margaret Anderson (NPS photo)

The annual Unveiling Day ceremony takes place each year to symbolically starts the process of engraving new names onto the memorial’s marble walls.

Anderson and Yung are among 321 fallen law enforcement officers nationwide whose names will be added to the memorial this spring. A series of formal ceremonies honoring the fallen officers will take place May 13-15 during National Police Week.

Anderson died that morning after she was shot by a suspect in a Seattle shooting on New Year’s Eve. Benjamin Colton Barnes drove through a tire-chain checkpoint near the park’s Nisqually entrance. Anderson, who was working at Paradise, drove down about a mile from the popular winter play area and set up a road block.

Barnes opened fire on Anderson when he saw her patrol vehicle. He fled into the nearby forest, but his body was found the next day in Paradise Creek.

The memorial, on E Street Northwest, features two curving, 304-foot-long blue-gray marble walls. Carved on the walls are the names of more than 19,000 U.S. officers who have been killed in the line of duty, dating back to the first known death in 1791.

On Friday, superintendent Randy King, chief ranger Chuck Young and other Mount Rainier staffers will be in Olympia for the Washington State Law Enforcement Medal of Honor ceremony.

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